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[20210430] The Straits Times - What does it mean to be a smart and sustainable cityhttps://www.spgroup.com.sg/dam/jcr:d1eb0dd3-254c-4c02-99d8-9b3da06e5799
What does it mean to be a smart and sustainable city? In the eco-vanguard are Tengah’s innovative cooling system and Punggol’s open digital platform Singapore is piloting more energy-efficient technologies, including district cooling systems like the one implemented in the Marina Bay district (above) in 2006, enabling energy savings of up to 40 per cent, according to energy utilities provider SP Group. Tengah new town will be similarly equipped with a centralised cooling system adapted for residential use. PHOTO: SP GROUP test new concepts of living, working and service delivery for the neighbourhood. In Tengah, numerous initiatives – such as solar photovoltaic installations (which convert sunlight directly into electricity) and charging systems for electric vehicles, along with battery energy storage systems – are planned in an integrated manner. SP Group’s OneTengah digital platform will allow town council and facility operators to better measure, monitor and manage what systems are being deployed. Sustainable districts in a city hold huge promise for turning eco-conscious living into a collaborative endeavour. When such innovations are successfully implemented, the city is able to reap many benefits from systems-level integration and enjoy economies of scale, including energy savings. People: However, the success of these innovations ultimately rests on the people on the ground. Governments and developers can build the necessary infrastructure, but to actually reduce emissions, residents must do their part through individual lifestyle choices. A recent media survey found that nine in 10 Singaporean millennials are willing to make personal sacrifices to support climate change mitigation efforts. That’s why Tengah is designed to make it as easy and socially desirable as possible for residents to reduce their carbon footprint. One way Tengah will do this is through Eco Boards – digital displays that provide residents with block-level information on energy and water use. These will encourage utilities savings through “friendly competition” among blocks and allow town councils to achieve more efficient estate management. Additionally, the MyTengah app will allow residents to understand household utilities usage, intelligently control air-conditioning usage and buy energy-efficient appliances. Hugh Lim For The Straits Times Climate change and urbanisation are two of the most important challenges facing the world today – and they are inextricably linked. In South-east Asia, one of the most rapidly developing regions in the world, millions are moving out of rural settings into more urbanised areas every year. Sadly, this urbanisation is usually accompanied by an increase in greenhouse gas emissions. However, this need not be the case. Recent studies reveal that residents of denser city centres emit half the greenhouse gas emissions of their suburban neighbours. Moreover, cities have the unique ability to respond to a global issue such as climate change at a more local level, engaging residents directly. Cities are crucibles of innovation and usually offer more immediate and effective communication between the public and decision-makers. Therefore, cities that are well planned and managed may hold the key to balancing economic growth and environmental sustainability. REQUIREMENTS OF SUCCESS On a city scale, urban infrastructure and policies are required to drive emissions reductions through lifestyle choices. Take the example of Tengah, Singapore’s most ambitious smart and sustainable new town to date. The Housing Board, in collaboration with energy utilities provider SP Group, will implement Singapore’s first large-scale residential centralised cooling system there. Such collaborations and initiatives will aid Singapore in achieving its pledge to cap its emissions by 2030 and halve them by 2050. Its success will hinge on three things: power, process and people. Power: Geophysical constraints make it challenging for Singapore to adopt large-scale renewable energy solutions. This makes improving the performance of energy-consuming systems critical. The National Climate Change Secretariat predicts an increase in average surface temperatures of 2.9 deg C to 4.6 deg C under the RCP8.5 greenhouse gas trajectory for the period of 2070 to 2099, relative to 1980 to 2009. (RCP8.5 is a baseline scenario referring to the concentration of carbon that delivers global warming at an average of 8.5 watts per sq m across the planet.) What an increase in average surface temperatures means for Singapore is that there will be a commensurate increase in demand for air-conditioners. The amount of energy used to cool Singapore – which has the highest rate in the South-east Asian region of air-conditioners installed per capita – is projected to grow by 73 per cent between 2010 and 2030. The good news is that Singapore is piloting more energy-efficient technologies, including district cooling systems like the one implemented in the Marina Bay district in 2006, enabling energy savings of up to 40 per cent, according to SP Group. Tengah, which is scaled at around 220 to 300 HDB blocks, will be similarly equipped with a centralised cooling system adapted for residential use. Through centralised cooling, lifetime household energy consumption is expected to be reduced by 30 per cent. The upcoming Punggol Digital District, developed by national industrial infrastructure developer JTC Corporation, will be equipped with a smart energy grid that can lower energy usage, distribute green energy such as solar power seamlessly across the district and detect abnormal energy consumption. In Punggol Digital District, the buildings will be 30 per cent more energy-efficient than conventional commercial buildings, thanks to the sustainable design and smart optimisation enabled by the district’s open digital platform. Process: Sustainable districts can serve as test beds for urban systems innovation, enabling government agencies and industry partners to pilot a suite of complementary policies and actions to tackle greenhouse gas emissions. Take Punggol’s open digital platform, which will collect districtwide data through its network of sensors, including building data (to do with lifts, lighting and occupancy, for example) and environmental data (such as temperature and rainfall). These data sets will allow JTC to optimise resources in real time and fix issues before they become serious problems. The open digital platform’s digital twin technology will also provide an experimental environment for anyone in the district. It will allow industries and researchers to tap the open data to MAKING A DIFFERENCE Tengah and Punggol Digital District are in the vanguard of city-level eco-smartness, but there are ways for everyone to contribute, no matter where in Singapore you live. SP Group is helping its customers to do just that through the My Carbon Footprint and My Green Credits features on the SP Utilities app. These allow customers to track carbon emissions resulting from electricity, water and gas consumption, and match this with the purchase of an equivalent amount of green energy. With the right urban infrastructure and power of knowledge, it will be possible to achieve climate action goals at both the individual and national levels. stopinion@sph.com.sg • Hugh Lim is the executive director of the Centre for Liveable Cities (www.clc.gov.sg), under the Ministry of National Development.
Searchhttps://www.spgroup.com.sg/search?tag=smart-city
Search [20210430] The Straits Times - What does it mean to be a smart and sustainable cityhttps://www.spgroup.com.sg/dam/jcr:d1eb0dd3-254c-4c02-99d8-9b3da06e5799 What does it mean to be a smart and sustainable city? In the eco-vanguard are Tengah’s innovative cooling system and Punggol’s open digital platform Singapore is piloting more energy-efficient technologies, including district cooling systems like the one implemented in the Marina Bay district (above) in 2006, enabling energy savings of up to 40 per cent, according to energy utilities provider SP Group. Tengah new town will be similarly equipped with a centralised cooling system adapted for residential use. PHOTO: SP GROUP test new concepts of living, working and service delivery for the neighbourhood. In Tengah, numerous initiatives – such as solar photovoltaic installations (which convert sunlight directly into electricity) and charging systems for electric vehicles, along with battery energy storage systems – are planned in an integrated manner. SP Group’s OneTengah digital platform will allow town council and facility operators to better measure, monitor and manage what systems are being deployed. Sustainable districts in a city hold huge promise for turning eco-conscious living into a collaborative endeavour. When such innovations are successfully implemented, the city is able to reap many benefits from systems-level integration and enjoy economies of scale, including energy savings. People: However, the success of these innovations ultimately rests on the people on the ground. Governments and developers can build the necessary infrastructure, but to actually reduce emissions, residents must do their part through individual lifestyle choices. A recent media survey found that nine in 10 Singaporean millennials are willing to make personal sacrifices to support climate change mitigation efforts. That’s why Tengah is designed to make it as easy and socially desirable as possible for residents to reduce their carbon footprint. One way Tengah will do this is through Eco Boards – digital displays that provide residents with block-level information on energy and water use. These will encourage utilities savings through “friendly competition” among blocks and allow town councils to achieve more efficient estate management. Additionally, the MyTengah app will allow residents to understand household utilities usage, intelligently control air-conditioning usage and buy energy-efficient appliances. Hugh Lim For The Straits Times Climate change and urbanisation are two of the most important challenges facing the world today – and they are inextricably linked. In South-east Asia, one of the most rapidly developing regions in the world, millions are moving out of rural settings into more urbanised areas every year. Sadly, this urbanisation is usually accompanied by an increase in greenhouse gas emissions. However, this need not be the case. Recent studies reveal that residents of denser city centres emit half the greenhouse gas emissions of their suburban neighbours. Moreover, cities have the unique ability to respond to a global issue such as climate change at a more local level, engaging residents directly. Cities are crucibles of innovation and usually offer more immediate and effective communication between the public and decision-makers. Therefore, cities that are well planned and managed may hold the key to balancing economic growth and environmental sustainability. REQUIREMENTS OF SUCCESS On a city scale, urban infrastructure and policies are required to drive emissions reductions through lifestyle choices. Take the example of Tengah, Singapore’s most ambitious smart and sustainable new town to date. The Housing Board, in collaboration with energy utilities provider SP Group, will implement Singapore’s first large-scale residential centralised cooling system there. Such collaborations and initiatives will aid Singapore in achieving its pledge to cap its emissions by 2030 and halve them by 2050. Its success will hinge on three things: power, process and people. Power: Geophysical constraints make it challenging for Singapore to adopt large-scale renewable energy solutions. This makes improving the performance of energy-consuming systems critical. The National Climate Change Secretariat predicts an increase in average surface temperatures of 2.9 deg C to 4.6 deg C under the RCP8.5 greenhouse gas trajectory for the period of 2070 to 2099, relative to 1980 to 2009. (RCP8.5 is a baseline scenario referring to the concentration of carbon that delivers global warming at an average of 8.5 watts per sq m across the planet.) What an increase in average surface temperatures means for Singapore is that there will be a commensurate increase in demand for air-conditioners. The amount of energy used to cool Singapore – which has the highest rate in the South-east Asian region of air-conditioners installed per capita – is projected to grow by 73 per cent between 2010 and 2030. The good news is that Singapore is piloting more energy-efficient technologies, including district cooling systems like the one implemented in the Marina Bay district in 2006, enabling energy savings of up to 40 per cent, according to SP Group. Tengah, which is scaled at around 220 to 300 HDB blocks, will be similarly equipped with a centralised cooling system adapted for residential use. Through centralised cooling, lifetime household energy consumption is expected to be reduced by 30 per cent. The upcoming Punggol Digital District, developed by national industrial infrastructure developer JTC Corporation, will be equipped with a smart energy grid that can lower energy usage, distribute green energy such as solar power seamlessly across the district and detect abnormal energy consumption. In Punggol Digital District, the buildings will be 30 per cent more energy-efficient than conventional commercial buildings, thanks to the sustainable design and smart optimisation enabled by the district’s open digital platform. Process: Sustainable districts can serve as test beds for urban systems innovation, enabling government agencies and industry partners to pilot a suite of complementary policies and actions to tackle greenhouse gas emissions. Take Punggol’s open digital platform, which will collect districtwide data through its network of sensors, including building data (to do with lifts, lighting and occupancy, for example) and environmental data (such as temperature and rainfall). These data sets will allow JTC to optimise resources in real time and fix issues before they become serious problems. The open digital platform’s digital twin technology will also provide an experimental environment for anyone in the district. It will allow industries and researchers to tap the open data to MAKING A DIFFERENCE Tengah and Punggol Digital District are in the vanguard of city-level eco-smartness, but there are ways for everyone to contribute, no matter where in Singapore you live. SP Group is helping its customers to do just that through the My Carbon Footprint and My Green Credits features on the SP Utilities app. These allow customers to track carbon emissions resulting from electricity, water and gas consumption, and match this with the purchase of an equivalent amount of green energy. With the right urban infrastructure and power of knowledge, it will be possible to achieve climate action goals at both the individual and national levels. stopinion@sph.com.sg • Hugh Lim is the executive director of the Centre for Liveable Cities (www.clc.gov.sg), under the Ministry of National Development. Searchhttps://www.spgroup.com.sg/search?tag=smart-city Search [20210430] The Straits Times - What does it mean to be a smart and sustainable cityhttps://www.spgroup.com.sg/dam/jcr:d1eb0dd3-254c-4c02-99d8-9b3da06e5799 What does it mean to be a smart and sustainable city? In the eco-vanguard are Tengah’s innovative cooling system and Punggol’s open digital platform Singapore is piloting more energy-efficient technologies, including district cooling systems like the one implemented in the Marina Bay district (above) in 2006, enabling energy savings of up to 40 per cent, according to energy utilities provider SP Group. Tengah new town will be similarly equipped with a centralised cooling system adapted for residential use. PHOTO: SP GROUP test new concepts of living, working and service delivery for the neighbourhood. In Tengah, numerous initiatives – such as solar photovoltaic installations (which convert sunlight directly into electricity) and charging systems for electric vehicles, along with battery energy storage systems – are planned in an integrated manner. SP Group’s OneTengah digital platform will allow town council and facility operators to better measure, monitor and manage what systems are being deployed. Sustainable districts in a city hold huge promise for turning eco-conscious living into a collaborative endeavour. When such innovations are successfully implemented, the city is able to reap many benefits from systems-level integration and enjoy economies of scale, including energy savings. People: However, the success of these innovations ultimately rests on the people on the ground. Governments and developers can build the necessary infrastructure, but to actually reduce emissions, residents must do their part through individual lifestyle choices. A recent media survey found that nine in 10 Singaporean millennials are willing to make personal sacrifices to support climate change mitigation efforts. That’s why Tengah is designed to make it as easy and socially desirable as possible for residents to reduce their carbon footprint. One way Tengah will do this is through Eco Boards – digital displays that provide residents with block-level information on energy and water use. These will encourage utilities savings through “friendly competition” among blocks and allow town councils to achieve more efficient estate management. Additionally, the MyTengah app will allow residents to understand household utilities usage, intelligently control air-conditioning usage and buy energy-efficient appliances. Hugh Lim For The Straits Times Climate change and urbanisation are two of the most important challenges facing the world today – and they are inextricably linked. In South-east Asia, one of the most rapidly developing regions in the world, millions are moving out of rural settings into more urbanised areas every year. Sadly, this urbanisation is usually accompanied by an increase in greenhouse gas emissions. However, this need not be the case. Recent studies reveal that residents of denser city centres emit half the greenhouse gas emissions of their suburban neighbours. Moreover, cities have the unique ability to respond to a global issue such as climate change at a more local level, engaging residents directly. Cities are crucibles of innovation and usually offer more immediate and effective communication between the public and decision-makers. Therefore, cities that are well planned and managed may hold the key to balancing economic growth and environmental sustainability. REQUIREMENTS OF SUCCESS On a city scale, urban infrastructure and policies are required to drive emissions reductions through lifestyle choices. Take the example of Tengah, Singapore’s most ambitious smart and sustainable new town to date. The Housing Board, in collaboration with energy utilities provider SP Group, will implement Singapore’s first large-scale residential centralised cooling system there. Such collaborations and initiatives will aid Singapore in achieving its pledge to cap its emissions by 2030 and halve them by 2050. Its success will hinge on three things: power, process and people. Power: Geophysical constraints make it challenging for Singapore to adopt large-scale renewable energy solutions. This makes improving the performance of energy-consuming systems critical. The National Climate Change Secretariat predicts an increase in average surface temperatures of 2.9 deg C to 4.6 deg C under the RCP8.5 greenhouse gas trajectory for the period of 2070 to 2099, relative to 1980 to 2009. (RCP8.5 is a baseline scenario referring to the concentration of carbon that delivers global warming at an average of 8.5 watts per sq m across the planet.) What an increase in average surface temperatures means for Singapore is that there will be a commensurate increase in demand for air-conditioners. The amount of energy used to cool Singapore – which has the highest rate in the South-east Asian region of air-conditioners installed per capita – is projected to grow by 73 per cent between 2010 and 2030. The good news is that Singapore is piloting more energy-efficient technologies, including district cooling systems like the one implemented in the Marina Bay district in 2006, enabling energy savings of up to 40 per cent, according to SP Group. Tengah, which is scaled at around 220 to 300 HDB blocks, will be similarly equipped with a centralised cooling system adapted for residential use. Through centralised cooling, lifetime household energy consumption is expected to be reduced by 30 per cent. The upcoming Punggol Digital District, developed by national industrial infrastructure developer JTC Corporation, will be equipped with a smart energy grid that can lower energy usage, distribute green energy such as solar power seamlessly across the district and detect abnormal energy consumption. In Punggol Digital District, the buildings will be 30 per cent more energy-efficient than conventional commercial buildings, thanks to the sustainable design and smart optimisation enabled by the district’s open digital platform. Process: Sustainable districts can serve as test beds for urban systems innovation, enabling government agencies and industry partners to pilot a suite of complementary policies and actions to tackle greenhouse gas emissions. Take Punggol’s open digital platform, which will collect districtwide data through its network of sensors, including building data (to do with lifts, lighting and occupancy, for example) and environmental data (such as temperature and rainfall). These data sets will allow JTC to optimise resources in real time and fix issues before they become serious problems. The open digital platform’s digital twin technology will also provide an experimental environment for anyone in the district. It will allow industries and researchers to tap the open data to MAKING A DIFFERENCE Tengah and Punggol Digital District are in the vanguard of city-level eco-smartness, but there are ways for everyone to contribute, no matter where in Singapore you live. SP Group is helping its customers to do just that through the My Carbon Footprint and My Green Credits features on the SP Utilities app. These allow customers to track carbon emissions resulting from electricity, water and gas consumption, and match this with the purchase of an equivalent amount of green energy. With the right urban infrastructure and power of knowledge, it will be possible to achieve climate action goals at both the individual and national levels. stopinion@sph.com.sg • Hugh Lim is the executive director of the Centre for Liveable Cities (www.clc.gov.sg), under the Ministry of National Development. Searchhttps://www.spgroup.com.sg/search?tag=smart-city Search Searchhttps://www.spgroup.com.sg/search?tag=smart-city Search Searchhttps://www.spgroup.com.sg/search?tag=smart-city Search Searchhttps://www.spgroup.com.sg/search?tag=smart-city Search Searchhttps://www.spgroup.com.sg/search?tag=smart-city Search Searchhttps://www.spgroup.com.sg/search?tag=smart-city Search Searchhttps://www.spgroup.com.sg/search?tag=smart-city Search Searchhttps://www.spgroup.com.sg/search?tag=smart-city Search [20210430] The Straits Times - What does it mean to be a smart and sustainable cityhttps://www.spgroup.com.sg/dam/jcr:d1eb0dd3-254c-4c02-99d8-9b3da06e5799 What does it mean to be a smart and sustainable city? In the eco-vanguard are Tengah’s innovative cooling system and Punggol’s open digital platform Singapore is piloting more energy-efficient technologies, including district cooling systems like the one implemented in the Marina Bay district (above) in 2006, enabling energy savings of up to 40 per cent, according to energy utilities provider SP Group. Tengah new town will be similarly equipped with a centralised cooling system adapted for residential use. PHOTO: SP GROUP test new concepts of living, working and service delivery for the neighbourhood. In Tengah, numerous initiatives – such as solar photovoltaic installations (which convert sunlight directly into electricity) and charging systems for electric vehicles, along with battery energy storage systems – are planned in an integrated manner. SP Group’s OneTengah digital platform will allow town council and facility operators to better measure, monitor and manage what systems are being deployed. Sustainable districts in a city hold huge promise for turning eco-conscious living into a collaborative endeavour. When such innovations are successfully implemented, the city is able to reap many benefits from systems-level integration and enjoy economies of scale, including energy savings. People: However, the success of these innovations ultimately rests on the people on the ground. Governments and developers can build the necessary infrastructure, but to actually reduce emissions, residents must do their part through individual lifestyle choices. A recent media survey found that nine in 10 Singaporean millennials are willing to make personal sacrifices to support climate change mitigation efforts. That’s why Tengah is designed to make it as easy and socially desirable as possible for residents to reduce their carbon footprint. One way Tengah will do this is through Eco Boards – digital displays that provide residents with block-level information on energy and water use. These will encourage utilities savings through “friendly competition” among blocks and allow town councils to achieve more efficient estate management. Additionally, the MyTengah app will allow residents to understand household utilities usage, intelligently control air-conditioning usage and buy energy-efficient appliances. Hugh Lim For The Straits Times Climate change and urbanisation are two of the most important challenges facing the world today – and they are inextricably linked. In South-east Asia, one of the most rapidly developing regions in the world, millions are moving out of rural settings into more urbanised areas every year. Sadly, this urbanisation is usually accompanied by an increase in greenhouse gas emissions. However, this need not be the case. Recent studies reveal that residents of denser city centres emit half the greenhouse gas emissions of their suburban neighbours. Moreover, cities have the unique ability to respond to a global issue such as climate change at a more local level, engaging residents directly. Cities are crucibles of innovation and usually offer more immediate and effective communication between the public and decision-makers. Therefore, cities that are well planned and managed may hold the key to balancing economic growth and environmental sustainability. REQUIREMENTS OF SUCCESS On a city scale, urban infrastructure and policies are required to drive emissions reductions through lifestyle choices. Take the example of Tengah, Singapore’s most ambitious smart and sustainable new town to date. The Housing Board, in collaboration with energy utilities provider SP Group, will implement Singapore’s first large-scale residential centralised cooling system there. Such collaborations and initiatives will aid Singapore in achieving its pledge to cap its emissions by 2030 and halve them by 2050. Its success will hinge on three things: power, process and people. Power: Geophysical constraints make it challenging for Singapore to adopt large-scale renewable energy solutions. This makes improving the performance of energy-consuming systems critical. The National Climate Change Secretariat predicts an increase in average surface temperatures of 2.9 deg C to 4.6 deg C under the RCP8.5 greenhouse gas trajectory for the period of 2070 to 2099, relative to 1980 to 2009. (RCP8.5 is a baseline scenario referring to the concentration of carbon that delivers global warming at an average of 8.5 watts per sq m across the planet.) What an increase in average surface temperatures means for Singapore is that there will be a commensurate increase in demand for air-conditioners. The amount of energy used to cool Singapore – which has the highest rate in the South-east Asian region of air-conditioners installed per capita – is projected to grow by 73 per cent between 2010 and 2030. The good news is that Singapore is piloting more energy-efficient technologies, including district cooling systems like the one implemented in the Marina Bay district in 2006, enabling energy savings of up to 40 per cent, according to SP Group. Tengah, which is scaled at around 220 to 300 HDB blocks, will be similarly equipped with a centralised cooling system adapted for residential use. Through centralised cooling, lifetime household energy consumption is expected to be reduced by 30 per cent. The upcoming Punggol Digital District, developed by national industrial infrastructure developer JTC Corporation, will be equipped with a smart energy grid that can lower energy usage, distribute green energy such as solar power seamlessly across the district and detect abnormal energy consumption. In Punggol Digital District, the buildings will be 30 per cent more energy-efficient than conventional commercial buildings, thanks to the sustainable design and smart optimisation enabled by the district’s open digital platform. Process: Sustainable districts can serve as test beds for urban systems innovation, enabling government agencies and industry partners to pilot a suite of complementary policies and actions to tackle greenhouse gas emissions. Take Punggol’s open digital platform, which will collect districtwide data through its network of sensors, including building data (to do with lifts, lighting and occupancy, for example) and environmental data (such as temperature and rainfall). These data sets will allow JTC to optimise resources in real time and fix issues before they become serious problems. The open digital platform’s digital twin technology will also provide an experimental environment for anyone in the district. It will allow industries and researchers to tap the open data to MAKING A DIFFERENCE Tengah and Punggol Digital District are in the vanguard of city-level eco-smartness, but there are ways for everyone to contribute, no matter where in Singapore you live. SP Group is helping its customers to do just that through the My Carbon Footprint and My Green Credits features on the SP Utilities app. These allow customers to track carbon emissions resulting from electricity, water and gas consumption, and match this with the purchase of an equivalent amount of green energy. With the right urban infrastructure and power of knowledge, it will be possible to achieve climate action goals at both the individual and national levels. stopinion@sph.com.sg • Hugh Lim is the executive director of the Centre for Liveable Cities (www.clc.gov.sg), under the Ministry of National Development. Searchhttps://www.spgroup.com.sg/search?tag=smart-city Search [20210430] The Straits Times - What does it mean to be a smart and sustainable cityhttps://www.spgroup.com.sg/dam/jcr:d1eb0dd3-254c-4c02-99d8-9b3da06e5799 What does it mean to be a smart and sustainable city? In the eco-vanguard are Tengah’s innovative cooling system and Punggol’s open digital platform Singapore is piloting more energy-efficient technologies, including district cooling systems like the one implemented in the Marina Bay district (above) in 2006, enabling energy savings of up to 40 per cent, according to energy utilities provider SP Group. Tengah new town will be similarly equipped with a centralised cooling system adapted for residential use. PHOTO: SP GROUP test new concepts of living, working and service delivery for the neighbourhood. In Tengah, numerous initiatives – such as solar photovoltaic installations (which convert sunlight directly into electricity) and charging systems for electric vehicles, along with battery energy storage systems – are planned in an integrated manner. SP Group’s OneTengah digital platform will allow town council and facility operators to better measure, monitor and manage what systems are being deployed. Sustainable districts in a city hold huge promise for turning eco-conscious living into a collaborative endeavour. When such innovations are successfully implemented, the city is able to reap many benefits from systems-level integration and enjoy economies of scale, including energy savings. People: However, the success of these innovations ultimately rests on the people on the ground. Governments and developers can build the necessary infrastructure, but to actually reduce emissions, residents must do their part through individual lifestyle choices. A recent media survey found that nine in 10 Singaporean millennials are willing to make personal sacrifices to support climate change mitigation efforts. That’s why Tengah is designed to make it as easy and socially desirable as possible for residents to reduce their carbon footprint. One way Tengah will do this is through Eco Boards – digital displays that provide residents with block-level information on energy and water use. These will encourage utilities savings through “friendly competition” among blocks and allow town councils to achieve more efficient estate management. Additionally, the MyTengah app will allow residents to understand household utilities usage, intelligently control air-conditioning usage and buy energy-efficient appliances. Hugh Lim For The Straits Times Climate change and urbanisation are two of the most important challenges facing the world today – and they are inextricably linked. In South-east Asia, one of the most rapidly developing regions in the world, millions are moving out of rural settings into more urbanised areas every year. Sadly, this urbanisation is usually accompanied by an increase in greenhouse gas emissions. However, this need not be the case. Recent studies reveal that residents of denser city centres emit half the greenhouse gas emissions of their suburban neighbours. Moreover, cities have the unique ability to respond to a global issue such as climate change at a more local level, engaging residents directly. Cities are crucibles of innovation and usually offer more immediate and effective communication between the public and decision-makers. Therefore, cities that are well planned and managed may hold the key to balancing economic growth and environmental sustainability. REQUIREMENTS OF SUCCESS On a city scale, urban infrastructure and policies are required to drive emissions reductions through lifestyle choices. Take the example of Tengah, Singapore’s most ambitious smart and sustainable new town to date. The Housing Board, in collaboration with energy utilities provider SP Group, will implement Singapore’s first large-scale residential centralised cooling system there. Such collaborations and initiatives will aid Singapore in achieving its pledge to cap its emissions by 2030 and halve them by 2050. Its success will hinge on three things: power, process and people. Power: Geophysical constraints make it challenging for Singapore to adopt large-scale renewable energy solutions. This makes improving the performance of energy-consuming systems critical. The National Climate Change Secretariat predicts an increase in average surface temperatures of 2.9 deg C to 4.6 deg C under the RCP8.5 greenhouse gas trajectory for the period of 2070 to 2099, relative to 1980 to 2009. (RCP8.5 is a baseline scenario referring to the concentration of carbon that delivers global warming at an average of 8.5 watts per sq m across the planet.) What an increase in average surface temperatures means for Singapore is that there will be a commensurate increase in demand for air-conditioners. The amount of energy used to cool Singapore – which has the highest rate in the South-east Asian region of air-conditioners installed per capita – is projected to grow by 73 per cent between 2010 and 2030. The good news is that Singapore is piloting more energy-efficient technologies, including district cooling systems like the one implemented in the Marina Bay district in 2006, enabling energy savings of up to 40 per cent, according to SP Group. Tengah, which is scaled at around 220 to 300 HDB blocks, will be similarly equipped with a centralised cooling system adapted for residential use. Through centralised cooling, lifetime household energy consumption is expected to be reduced by 30 per cent. The upcoming Punggol Digital District, developed by national industrial infrastructure developer JTC Corporation, will be equipped with a smart energy grid that can lower energy usage, distribute green energy such as solar power seamlessly across the district and detect abnormal energy consumption. In Punggol Digital District, the buildings will be 30 per cent more energy-efficient than conventional commercial buildings, thanks to the sustainable design and smart optimisation enabled by the district’s open digital platform. Process: Sustainable districts can serve as test beds for urban systems innovation, enabling government agencies and industry partners to pilot a suite of complementary policies and actions to tackle greenhouse gas emissions. Take Punggol’s open digital platform, which will collect districtwide data through its network of sensors, including building data (to do with lifts, lighting and occupancy, for example) and environmental data (such as temperature and rainfall). These data sets will allow JTC to optimise resources in real time and fix issues before they become serious problems. The open digital platform’s digital twin technology will also provide an experimental environment for anyone in the district. It will allow industries and researchers to tap the open data to MAKING A DIFFERENCE Tengah and Punggol Digital District are in the vanguard of city-level eco-smartness, but there are ways for everyone to contribute, no matter where in Singapore you live. SP Group is helping its customers to do just that through the My Carbon Footprint and My Green Credits features on the SP Utilities app. These allow customers to track carbon emissions resulting from electricity, water and gas consumption, and match this with the purchase of an equivalent amount of green energy. With the right urban infrastructure and power of knowledge, it will be possible to achieve climate action goals at both the individual and national levels. stopinion@sph.com.sg • Hugh Lim is the executive director of the Centre for Liveable Cities (www.clc.gov.sg), under the Ministry of National Development. Searchhttps://www.spgroup.com.sg/search?tag=smart-city Search [20210430] The Straits Times - What does it mean to be a smart and sustainable cityhttps://www.spgroup.com.sg/dam/jcr:d1eb0dd3-254c-4c02-99d8-9b3da06e5799 What does it mean to be a smart and sustainable city? In the eco-vanguard are Tengah’s innovative cooling system and Punggol’s open digital platform Singapore is piloting more energy-efficient technologies, including district cooling systems like the one implemented in the Marina Bay district (above) in 2006, enabling energy savings of up to 40 per cent, according to energy utilities provider SP Group. Tengah new town will be similarly equipped with a centralised cooling system adapted for residential use. PHOTO: SP GROUP test new concepts of living, working and service delivery for the neighbourhood. In Tengah, numerous initiatives – such as solar photovoltaic installations (which convert sunlight directly into electricity) and charging systems for electric vehicles, along with battery energy storage systems – are planned in an integrated manner. SP Group’s OneTengah digital platform will allow town council and facility operators to better measure, monitor and manage what systems are being deployed. Sustainable districts in a city hold huge promise for turning eco-conscious living into a collaborative endeavour. When such innovations are successfully implemented, the city is able to reap many benefits from systems-level integration and enjoy economies of scale, including energy savings. People: However, the success of these innovations ultimately rests on the people on the ground. Governments and developers can build the necessary infrastructure, but to actually reduce emissions, residents must do their part through individual lifestyle choices. A recent media survey found that nine in 10 Singaporean millennials are willing to make personal sacrifices to support climate change mitigation efforts. That’s why Tengah is designed to make it as easy and socially desirable as possible for residents to reduce their carbon footprint. One way Tengah will do this is through Eco Boards – digital displays that provide residents with block-level information on energy and water use. These will encourage utilities savings through “friendly competition” among blocks and allow town councils to achieve more efficient estate management. Additionally, the MyTengah app will allow residents to understand household utilities usage, intelligently control air-conditioning usage and buy energy-efficient appliances. Hugh Lim For The Straits Times Climate change and urbanisation are two of the most important challenges facing the world today – and they are inextricably linked. In South-east Asia, one of the most rapidly developing regions in the world, millions are moving out of rural settings into more urbanised areas every year. Sadly, this urbanisation is usually accompanied by an increase in greenhouse gas emissions. However, this need not be the case. Recent studies reveal that residents of denser city centres emit half the greenhouse gas emissions of their suburban neighbours. Moreover, cities have the unique ability to respond to a global issue such as climate change at a more local level, engaging residents directly. Cities are crucibles of innovation and usually offer more immediate and effective communication between the public and decision-makers. Therefore, cities that are well planned and managed may hold the key to balancing economic growth and environmental sustainability. REQUIREMENTS OF SUCCESS On a city scale, urban infrastructure and policies are required to drive emissions reductions through lifestyle choices. Take the example of Tengah, Singapore’s most ambitious smart and sustainable new town to date. The Housing Board, in collaboration with energy utilities provider SP Group, will implement Singapore’s first large-scale residential centralised cooling system there. Such collaborations and initiatives will aid Singapore in achieving its pledge to cap its emissions by 2030 and halve them by 2050. Its success will hinge on three things: power, process and people. Power: Geophysical constraints make it challenging for Singapore to adopt large-scale renewable energy solutions. This makes improving the performance of energy-consuming systems critical. The National Climate Change Secretariat predicts an increase in average surface temperatures of 2.9 deg C to 4.6 deg C under the RCP8.5 greenhouse gas trajectory for the period of 2070 to 2099, relative to 1980 to 2009. (RCP8.5 is a baseline scenario referring to the concentration of carbon that delivers global warming at an average of 8.5 watts per sq m across the planet.) What an increase in average surface temperatures means for Singapore is that there will be a commensurate increase in demand for air-conditioners. The amount of energy used to cool Singapore – which has the highest rate in the South-east Asian region of air-conditioners installed per capita – is projected to grow by 73 per cent between 2010 and 2030. The good news is that Singapore is piloting more energy-efficient technologies, including district cooling systems like the one implemented in the Marina Bay district in 2006, enabling energy savings of up to 40 per cent, according to SP Group. Tengah, which is scaled at around 220 to 300 HDB blocks, will be similarly equipped with a centralised cooling system adapted for residential use. Through centralised cooling, lifetime household energy consumption is expected to be reduced by 30 per cent. The upcoming Punggol Digital District, developed by national industrial infrastructure developer JTC Corporation, will be equipped with a smart energy grid that can lower energy usage, distribute green energy such as solar power seamlessly across the district and detect abnormal energy consumption. In Punggol Digital District, the buildings will be 30 per cent more energy-efficient than conventional commercial buildings, thanks to the sustainable design and smart optimisation enabled by the district’s open digital platform. Process: Sustainable districts can serve as test beds for urban systems innovation, enabling government agencies and industry partners to pilot a suite of complementary policies and actions to tackle greenhouse gas emissions. Take Punggol’s open digital platform, which will collect districtwide data through its network of sensors, including building data (to do with lifts, lighting and occupancy, for example) and environmental data (such as temperature and rainfall). These data sets will allow JTC to optimise resources in real time and fix issues before they become serious problems. The open digital platform’s digital twin technology will also provide an experimental environment for anyone in the district. It will allow industries and researchers to tap the open data to MAKING A DIFFERENCE Tengah and Punggol Digital District are in the vanguard of city-level eco-smartness, but there are ways for everyone to contribute, no matter where in Singapore you live. SP Group is helping its customers to do just that through the My Carbon Footprint and My Green Credits features on the SP Utilities app. These allow customers to track carbon emissions resulting from electricity, water and gas consumption, and match this with the purchase of an equivalent amount of green energy. With the right urban infrastructure and power of knowledge, it will be possible to achieve climate action goals at both the individual and national levels. stopinion@sph.com.sg • Hugh Lim is the executive director of the Centre for Liveable Cities (www.clc.gov.sg), under the Ministry of National Development. Searchhttps://www.spgroup.com.sg/search?tag=smart-city Search [20210430] The Straits Times - What does it mean to be a smart and sustainable cityhttps://www.spgroup.com.sg/dam/jcr:d1eb0dd3-254c-4c02-99d8-9b3da06e5799 What does it mean to be a smart and sustainable city? In the eco-vanguard are Tengah’s innovative cooling system and Punggol’s open digital platform Singapore is piloting more energy-efficient technologies, including district cooling systems like the one implemented in the Marina Bay district (above) in 2006, enabling energy savings of up to 40 per cent, according to energy utilities provider SP Group. Tengah new town will be similarly equipped with a centralised cooling system adapted for residential use. PHOTO: SP GROUP test new concepts of living, working and service delivery for the neighbourhood. In Tengah, numerous initiatives – such as solar photovoltaic installations (which convert sunlight directly into electricity) and charging systems for electric vehicles, along with battery energy storage systems – are planned in an integrated manner. SP Group’s OneTengah digital platform will allow town council and facility operators to better measure, monitor and manage what systems are being deployed. Sustainable districts in a city hold huge promise for turning eco-conscious living into a collaborative endeavour. When such innovations are successfully implemented, the city is able to reap many benefits from systems-level integration and enjoy economies of scale, including energy savings. People: However, the success of these innovations ultimately rests on the people on the ground. Governments and developers can build the necessary infrastructure, but to actually reduce emissions, residents must do their part through individual lifestyle choices. A recent media survey found that nine in 10 Singaporean millennials are willing to make personal sacrifices to support climate change mitigation efforts. That’s why Tengah is designed to make it as easy and socially desirable as possible for residents to reduce their carbon footprint. One way Tengah will do this is through Eco Boards – digital displays that provide residents with block-level information on energy and water use. These will encourage utilities savings through “friendly competition” among blocks and allow town councils to achieve more efficient estate management. Additionally, the MyTengah app will allow residents to understand household utilities usage, intelligently control air-conditioning usage and buy energy-efficient appliances. Hugh Lim For The Straits Times Climate change and urbanisation are two of the most important challenges facing the world today – and they are inextricably linked. In South-east Asia, one of the most rapidly developing regions in the world, millions are moving out of rural settings into more urbanised areas every year. Sadly, this urbanisation is usually accompanied by an increase in greenhouse gas emissions. However, this need not be the case. Recent studies reveal that residents of denser city centres emit half the greenhouse gas emissions of their suburban neighbours. Moreover, cities have the unique ability to respond to a global issue such as climate change at a more local level, engaging residents directly. Cities are crucibles of innovation and usually offer more immediate and effective communication between the public and decision-makers. Therefore, cities that are well planned and managed may hold the key to balancing economic growth and environmental sustainability. REQUIREMENTS OF SUCCESS On a city scale, urban infrastructure and policies are required to drive emissions reductions through lifestyle choices. Take the example of Tengah, Singapore’s most ambitious smart and sustainable new town to date. The Housing Board, in collaboration with energy utilities provider SP Group, will implement Singapore’s first large-scale residential centralised cooling system there. Such collaborations and initiatives will aid Singapore in achieving its pledge to cap its emissions by 2030 and halve them by 2050. Its success will hinge on three things: power, process and people. Power: Geophysical constraints make it challenging for Singapore to adopt large-scale renewable energy solutions. This makes improving the performance of energy-consuming systems critical. The National Climate Change Secretariat predicts an increase in average surface temperatures of 2.9 deg C to 4.6 deg C under the RCP8.5 greenhouse gas trajectory for the period of 2070 to 2099, relative to 1980 to 2009. (RCP8.5 is a baseline scenario referring to the concentration of carbon that delivers global warming at an average of 8.5 watts per sq m across the planet.) What an increase in average surface temperatures means for Singapore is that there will be a commensurate increase in demand for air-conditioners. The amount of energy used to cool Singapore – which has the highest rate in the South-east Asian region of air-conditioners installed per capita – is projected to grow by 73 per cent between 2010 and 2030. The good news is that Singapore is piloting more energy-efficient technologies, including district cooling systems like the one implemented in the Marina Bay district in 2006, enabling energy savings of up to 40 per cent, according to SP Group. Tengah, which is scaled at around 220 to 300 HDB blocks, will be similarly equipped with a centralised cooling system adapted for residential use. Through centralised cooling, lifetime household energy consumption is expected to be reduced by 30 per cent. The upcoming Punggol Digital District, developed by national industrial infrastructure developer JTC Corporation, will be equipped with a smart energy grid that can lower energy usage, distribute green energy such as solar power seamlessly across the district and detect abnormal energy consumption. In Punggol Digital District, the buildings will be 30 per cent more energy-efficient than conventional commercial buildings, thanks to the sustainable design and smart optimisation enabled by the district’s open digital platform. Process: Sustainable districts can serve as test beds for urban systems innovation, enabling government agencies and industry partners to pilot a suite of complementary policies and actions to tackle greenhouse gas emissions. Take Punggol’s open digital platform, which will collect districtwide data through its network of sensors, including building data (to do with lifts, lighting and occupancy, for example) and environmental data (such as temperature and rainfall). These data sets will allow JTC to optimise resources in real time and fix issues before they become serious problems. The open digital platform’s digital twin technology will also provide an experimental environment for anyone in the district. It will allow industries and researchers to tap the open data to MAKING A DIFFERENCE Tengah and Punggol Digital District are in the vanguard of city-level eco-smartness, but there are ways for everyone to contribute, no matter where in Singapore you live. SP Group is helping its customers to do just that through the My Carbon Footprint and My Green Credits features on the SP Utilities app. These allow customers to track carbon emissions resulting from electricity, water and gas consumption, and match this with the purchase of an equivalent amount of green energy. With the right urban infrastructure and power of knowledge, it will be possible to achieve climate action goals at both the individual and national levels. stopinion@sph.com.sg • Hugh Lim is the executive director of the Centre for Liveable Cities (www.clc.gov.sg), under the Ministry of National Development. Searchhttps://www.spgroup.com.sg/search?tag=smart-city Search [20210430] The Straits Times - What does it mean to be a smart and sustainable cityhttps://www.spgroup.com.sg/dam/jcr:d1eb0dd3-254c-4c02-99d8-9b3da06e5799 What does it mean to be a smart and sustainable city? In the eco-vanguard are Tengah’s innovative cooling system and Punggol’s open digital platform Singapore is piloting more energy-efficient technologies, including district cooling systems like the one implemented in the Marina Bay district (above) in 2006, enabling energy savings of up to 40 per cent, according to energy utilities provider SP Group. Tengah new town will be similarly equipped with a centralised cooling system adapted for residential use. PHOTO: SP GROUP test new concepts of living, working and service delivery for the neighbourhood. In Tengah, numerous initiatives – such as solar photovoltaic installations (which convert sunlight directly into electricity) and charging systems for electric vehicles, along with battery energy storage systems – are planned in an integrated manner. SP Group’s OneTengah digital platform will allow town council and facility operators to better measure, monitor and manage what systems are being deployed. Sustainable districts in a city hold huge promise for turning eco-conscious living into a collaborative endeavour. When such innovations are successfully implemented, the city is able to reap many benefits from systems-level integration and enjoy economies of scale, including energy savings. People: However, the success of these innovations ultimately rests on the people on the ground. Governments and developers can build the necessary infrastructure, but to actually reduce emissions, residents must do their part through individual lifestyle choices. A recent media survey found that nine in 10 Singaporean millennials are willing to make personal sacrifices to support climate change mitigation efforts. That’s why Tengah is designed to make it as easy and socially desirable as possible for residents to reduce their carbon footprint. One way Tengah will do this is through Eco Boards – digital displays that provide residents with block-level information on energy and water use. These will encourage utilities savings through “friendly competition” among blocks and allow town councils to achieve more efficient estate management. Additionally, the MyTengah app will allow residents to understand household utilities usage, intelligently control air-conditioning usage and buy energy-efficient appliances. Hugh Lim For The Straits Times Climate change and urbanisation are two of the most important challenges facing the world today – and they are inextricably linked. In South-east Asia, one of the most rapidly developing regions in the world, millions are moving out of rural settings into more urbanised areas every year. Sadly, this urbanisation is usually accompanied by an increase in greenhouse gas emissions. However, this need not be the case. Recent studies reveal that residents of denser city centres emit half the greenhouse gas emissions of their suburban neighbours. Moreover, cities have the unique ability to respond to a global issue such as climate change at a more local level, engaging residents directly. Cities are crucibles of innovation and usually offer more immediate and effective communication between the public and decision-makers. Therefore, cities that are well planned and managed may hold the key to balancing economic growth and environmental sustainability. REQUIREMENTS OF SUCCESS On a city scale, urban infrastructure and policies are required to drive emissions reductions through lifestyle choices. Take the example of Tengah, Singapore’s most ambitious smart and sustainable new town to date. The Housing Board, in collaboration with energy utilities provider SP Group, will implement Singapore’s first large-scale residential centralised cooling system there. Such collaborations and initiatives will aid Singapore in achieving its pledge to cap its emissions by 2030 and halve them by 2050. Its success will hinge on three things: power, process and people. Power: Geophysical constraints make it challenging for Singapore to adopt large-scale renewable energy solutions. This makes improving the performance of energy-consuming systems critical. The National Climate Change Secretariat predicts an increase in average surface temperatures of 2.9 deg C to 4.6 deg C under the RCP8.5 greenhouse gas trajectory for the period of 2070 to 2099, relative to 1980 to 2009. (RCP8.5 is a baseline scenario referring to the concentration of carbon that delivers global warming at an average of 8.5 watts per sq m across the planet.) What an increase in average surface temperatures means for Singapore is that there will be a commensurate increase in demand for air-conditioners. The amount of energy used to cool Singapore – which has the highest rate in the South-east Asian region of air-conditioners installed per capita – is projected to grow by 73 per cent between 2010 and 2030. The good news is that Singapore is piloting more energy-efficient technologies, including district cooling systems like the one implemented in the Marina Bay district in 2006, enabling energy savings of up to 40 per cent, according to SP Group. Tengah, which is scaled at around 220 to 300 HDB blocks, will be similarly equipped with a centralised cooling system adapted for residential use. Through centralised cooling, lifetime household energy consumption is expected to be reduced by 30 per cent. The upcoming Punggol Digital District, developed by national industrial infrastructure developer JTC Corporation, will be equipped with a smart energy grid that can lower energy usage, distribute green energy such as solar power seamlessly across the district and detect abnormal energy consumption. In Punggol Digital District, the buildings will be 30 per cent more energy-efficient than conventional commercial buildings, thanks to the sustainable design and smart optimisation enabled by the district’s open digital platform. Process: Sustainable districts can serve as test beds for urban systems innovation, enabling government agencies and industry partners to pilot a suite of complementary policies and actions to tackle greenhouse gas emissions. Take Punggol’s open digital platform, which will collect districtwide data through its network of sensors, including building data (to do with lifts, lighting and occupancy, for example) and environmental data (such as temperature and rainfall). These data sets will allow JTC to optimise resources in real time and fix issues before they become serious problems. The open digital platform’s digital twin technology will also provide an experimental environment for anyone in the district. It will allow industries and researchers to tap the open data to MAKING A DIFFERENCE Tengah and Punggol Digital District are in the vanguard of city-level eco-smartness, but there are ways for everyone to contribute, no matter where in Singapore you live. SP Group is helping its customers to do just that through the My Carbon Footprint and My Green Credits features on the SP Utilities app. These allow customers to track carbon emissions resulting from electricity, water and gas consumption, and match this with the purchase of an equivalent amount of green energy. With the right urban infrastructure and power of knowledge, it will be possible to achieve climate action goals at both the individual and national levels. stopinion@sph.com.sg • Hugh Lim is the executive director of the Centre for Liveable Cities (www.clc.gov.sg), under the Ministry of National Development. Searchhttps://www.spgroup.com.sg/search?tag=smart-city Search [20210430] The Straits Times - What does it mean to be a smart and sustainable cityhttps://www.spgroup.com.sg/dam/jcr:d1eb0dd3-254c-4c02-99d8-9b3da06e5799 What does it mean to be a smart and sustainable city? In the eco-vanguard are Tengah’s innovative cooling system and Punggol’s open digital platform Singapore is piloting more energy-efficient technologies, including district cooling systems like the one implemented in the Marina Bay district (above) in 2006, enabling energy savings of up to 40 per cent, according to energy utilities provider SP Group. Tengah new town will be similarly equipped with a centralised cooling system adapted for residential use. PHOTO: SP GROUP test new concepts of living, working and service delivery for the neighbourhood. In Tengah, numerous initiatives – such as solar photovoltaic installations (which convert sunlight directly into electricity) and charging systems for electric vehicles, along with battery energy storage systems – are planned in an integrated manner. SP Group’s OneTengah digital platform will allow town council and facility operators to better measure, monitor and manage what systems are being deployed. Sustainable districts in a city hold huge promise for turning eco-conscious living into a collaborative endeavour. When such innovations are successfully implemented, the city is able to reap many benefits from systems-level integration and enjoy economies of scale, including energy savings. People: However, the success of these innovations ultimately rests on the people on the ground. Governments and developers can build the necessary infrastructure, but to actually reduce emissions, residents must do their part through individual lifestyle choices. A recent media survey found that nine in 10 Singaporean millennials are willing to make personal sacrifices to support climate change mitigation efforts. That’s why Tengah is designed to make it as easy and socially desirable as possible for residents to reduce their carbon footprint. One way Tengah will do this is through Eco Boards – digital displays that provide residents with block-level information on energy and water use. These will encourage utilities savings through “friendly competition” among blocks and allow town councils to achieve more efficient estate management. Additionally, the MyTengah app will allow residents to understand household utilities usage, intelligently control air-conditioning usage and buy energy-efficient appliances. Hugh Lim For The Straits Times Climate change and urbanisation are two of the most important challenges facing the world today – and they are inextricably linked. In South-east Asia, one of the most rapidly developing regions in the world, millions are moving out of rural settings into more urbanised areas every year. Sadly, this urbanisation is usually accompanied by an increase in greenhouse gas emissions. However, this need not be the case. Recent studies reveal that residents of denser city centres emit half the greenhouse gas emissions of their suburban neighbours. Moreover, cities have the unique ability to respond to a global issue such as climate change at a more local level, engaging residents directly. Cities are crucibles of innovation and usually offer more immediate and effective communication between the public and decision-makers. Therefore, cities that are well planned and managed may hold the key to balancing economic growth and environmental sustainability. REQUIREMENTS OF SUCCESS On a city scale, urban infrastructure and policies are required to drive emissions reductions through lifestyle choices. Take the example of Tengah, Singapore’s most ambitious smart and sustainable new town to date. The Housing Board, in collaboration with energy utilities provider SP Group, will implement Singapore’s first large-scale residential centralised cooling system there. Such collaborations and initiatives will aid Singapore in achieving its pledge to cap its emissions by 2030 and halve them by 2050. Its success will hinge on three things: power, process and people. Power: Geophysical constraints make it challenging for Singapore to adopt large-scale renewable energy solutions. This makes improving the performance of energy-consuming systems critical. The National Climate Change Secretariat predicts an increase in average surface temperatures of 2.9 deg C to 4.6 deg C under the RCP8.5 greenhouse gas trajectory for the period of 2070 to 2099, relative to 1980 to 2009. (RCP8.5 is a baseline scenario referring to the concentration of carbon that delivers global warming at an average of 8.5 watts per sq m across the planet.) What an increase in average surface temperatures means for Singapore is that there will be a commensurate increase in demand for air-conditioners. The amount of energy used to cool Singapore – which has the highest rate in the South-east Asian region of air-conditioners installed per capita – is projected to grow by 73 per cent between 2010 and 2030. The good news is that Singapore is piloting more energy-efficient technologies, including district cooling systems like the one implemented in the Marina Bay district in 2006, enabling energy savings of up to 40 per cent, according to SP Group. Tengah, which is scaled at around 220 to 300 HDB blocks, will be similarly equipped with a centralised cooling system adapted for residential use. Through centralised cooling, lifetime household energy consumption is expected to be reduced by 30 per cent. The upcoming Punggol Digital District, developed by national industrial infrastructure developer JTC Corporation, will be equipped with a smart energy grid that can lower energy usage, distribute green energy such as solar power seamlessly across the district and detect abnormal energy consumption. In Punggol Digital District, the buildings will be 30 per cent more energy-efficient than conventional commercial buildings, thanks to the sustainable design and smart optimisation enabled by the district’s open digital platform. Process: Sustainable districts can serve as test beds for urban systems innovation, enabling government agencies and industry partners to pilot a suite of complementary policies and actions to tackle greenhouse gas emissions. Take Punggol’s open digital platform, which will collect districtwide data through its network of sensors, including building data (to do with lifts, lighting and occupancy, for example) and environmental data (such as temperature and rainfall). These data sets will allow JTC to optimise resources in real time and fix issues before they become serious problems. The open digital platform’s digital twin technology will also provide an experimental environment for anyone in the district. It will allow industries and researchers to tap the open data to MAKING A DIFFERENCE Tengah and Punggol Digital District are in the vanguard of city-level eco-smartness, but there are ways for everyone to contribute, no matter where in Singapore you live. SP Group is helping its customers to do just that through the My Carbon Footprint and My Green Credits features on the SP Utilities app. These allow customers to track carbon emissions resulting from electricity, water and gas consumption, and match this with the purchase of an equivalent amount of green energy. With the right urban infrastructure and power of knowledge, it will be possible to achieve climate action goals at both the individual and national levels. stopinion@sph.com.sg • Hugh Lim is the executive director of the Centre for Liveable Cities (www.clc.gov.sg), under the Ministry of National Development. Searchhttps://www.spgroup.com.sg/search?tag=smart-city Search [20210430] The Straits Times - What does it mean to be a smart and sustainable cityhttps://www.spgroup.com.sg/dam/jcr:d1eb0dd3-254c-4c02-99d8-9b3da06e5799 What does it mean to be a smart and sustainable city? In the eco-vanguard are Tengah’s innovative cooling system and Punggol’s open digital platform Singapore is piloting more energy-efficient technologies, including district cooling systems like the one implemented in the Marina Bay district (above) in 2006, enabling energy savings of up to 40 per cent, according to energy utilities provider SP Group. Tengah new town will be similarly equipped with a centralised cooling system adapted for residential use. PHOTO: SP GROUP test new concepts of living, working and service delivery for the neighbourhood. In Tengah, numerous initiatives – such as solar photovoltaic installations (which convert sunlight directly into electricity) and charging systems for electric vehicles, along with battery energy storage systems – are planned in an integrated manner. SP Group’s OneTengah digital platform will allow town council and facility operators to better measure, monitor and manage what systems are being deployed. Sustainable districts in a city hold huge promise for turning eco-conscious living into a collaborative endeavour. When such innovations are successfully implemented, the city is able to reap many benefits from systems-level integration and enjoy economies of scale, including energy savings. People: However, the success of these innovations ultimately rests on the people on the ground. Governments and developers can build the necessary infrastructure, but to actually reduce emissions, residents must do their part through individual lifestyle choices. A recent media survey found that nine in 10 Singaporean millennials are willing to make personal sacrifices to support climate change mitigation efforts. That’s why Tengah is designed to make it as easy and socially desirable as possible for residents to reduce their carbon footprint. One way Tengah will do this is through Eco Boards – digital displays that provide residents with block-level information on energy and water use. These will encourage utilities savings through “friendly competition” among blocks and allow town councils to achieve more efficient estate management. Additionally, the MyTengah app will allow residents to understand household utilities usage, intelligently control air-conditioning usage and buy energy-efficient appliances. Hugh Lim For The Straits Times Climate change and urbanisation are two of the most important challenges facing the world today – and they are inextricably linked. In South-east Asia, one of the most rapidly developing regions in the world, millions are moving out of rural settings into more urbanised areas every year. Sadly, this urbanisation is usually accompanied by an increase in greenhouse gas emissions. However, this need not be the case. Recent studies reveal that residents of denser city centres emit half the greenhouse gas emissions of their suburban neighbours. Moreover, cities have the unique ability to respond to a global issue such as climate change at a more local level, engaging residents directly. Cities are crucibles of innovation and usually offer more immediate and effective communication between the public and decision-makers. Therefore, cities that are well planned and managed may hold the key to balancing economic growth and environmental sustainability. REQUIREMENTS OF SUCCESS On a city scale, urban infrastructure and policies are required to drive emissions reductions through lifestyle choices. Take the example of Tengah, Singapore’s most ambitious smart and sustainable new town to date. The Housing Board, in collaboration with energy utilities provider SP Group, will implement Singapore’s first large-scale residential centralised cooling system there. Such collaborations and initiatives will aid Singapore in achieving its pledge to cap its emissions by 2030 and halve them by 2050. Its success will hinge on three things: power, process and people. Power: Geophysical constraints make it challenging for Singapore to adopt large-scale renewable energy solutions. This makes improving the performance of energy-consuming systems critical. The National Climate Change Secretariat predicts an increase in average surface temperatures of 2.9 deg C to 4.6 deg C under the RCP8.5 greenhouse gas trajectory for the period of 2070 to 2099, relative to 1980 to 2009. (RCP8.5 is a baseline scenario referring to the concentration of carbon that delivers global warming at an average of 8.5 watts per sq m across the planet.) What an increase in average surface temperatures means for Singapore is that there will be a commensurate increase in demand for air-conditioners. The amount of energy used to cool Singapore – which has the highest rate in the South-east Asian region of air-conditioners installed per capita – is projected to grow by 73 per cent between 2010 and 2030. The good news is that Singapore is piloting more energy-efficient technologies, including district cooling systems like the one implemented in the Marina Bay district in 2006, enabling energy savings of up to 40 per cent, according to SP Group. Tengah, which is scaled at around 220 to 300 HDB blocks, will be similarly equipped with a centralised cooling system adapted for residential use. Through centralised cooling, lifetime household energy consumption is expected to be reduced by 30 per cent. The upcoming Punggol Digital District, developed by national industrial infrastructure developer JTC Corporation, will be equipped with a smart energy grid that can lower energy usage, distribute green energy such as solar power seamlessly across the district and detect abnormal energy consumption. In Punggol Digital District, the buildings will be 30 per cent more energy-efficient than conventional commercial buildings, thanks to the sustainable design and smart optimisation enabled by the district’s open digital platform. Process: Sustainable districts can serve as test beds for urban systems innovation, enabling government agencies and industry partners to pilot a suite of complementary policies and actions to tackle greenhouse gas emissions. Take Punggol’s open digital platform, which will collect districtwide data through its network of sensors, including building data (to do with lifts, lighting and occupancy, for example) and environmental data (such as temperature and rainfall). These data sets will allow JTC to optimise resources in real time and fix issues before they become serious problems. The open digital platform’s digital twin technology will also provide an experimental environment for anyone in the district. It will allow industries and researchers to tap the open data to MAKING A DIFFERENCE Tengah and Punggol Digital District are in the vanguard of city-level eco-smartness, but there are ways for everyone to contribute, no matter where in Singapore you live. SP Group is helping its customers to do just that through the My Carbon Footprint and My Green Credits features on the SP Utilities app. These allow customers to track carbon emissions resulting from electricity, water and gas consumption, and match this with the purchase of an equivalent amount of green energy. With the right urban infrastructure and power of knowledge, it will be possible to achieve climate action goals at both the individual and national levels. stopinion@sph.com.sg • Hugh Lim is the executive director of the Centre for Liveable Cities (www.clc.gov.sg), under the Ministry of National Development. Searchhttps://www.spgroup.com.sg/search?tag=smart-city Search Searchhttps://www.spgroup.com.sg/search?tag=smart-city Search [20210430] The Straits Times - What does it mean to be a smart and sustainable cityhttps://www.spgroup.com.sg/dam/jcr:d1eb0dd3-254c-4c02-99d8-9b3da06e5799 What does it mean to be a smart and sustainable city? In the eco-vanguard are Tengah’s innovative cooling system and Punggol’s open digital platform Singapore is piloting more energy-efficient technologies, including district cooling systems like the one implemented in the Marina Bay district (above) in 2006, enabling energy savings of up to 40 per cent, according to energy utilities provider SP Group. Tengah new town will be similarly equipped with a centralised cooling system adapted for residential use. PHOTO: SP GROUP test new concepts of living, working and service delivery for the neighbourhood. In Tengah, numerous initiatives – such as solar photovoltaic installations (which convert sunlight directly into electricity) and charging systems for electric vehicles, along with battery energy storage systems – are planned in an integrated manner. SP Group’s OneTengah digital platform will allow town council and facility operators to better measure, monitor and manage what systems are being deployed. Sustainable districts in a city hold huge promise for turning eco-conscious living into a collaborative endeavour. When such innovations are successfully implemented, the city is able to reap many benefits from systems-level integration and enjoy economies of scale, including energy savings. People: However, the success of these innovations ultimately rests on the people on the ground. Governments and developers can build the necessary infrastructure, but to actually reduce emissions, residents must do their part through individual lifestyle choices. A recent media survey found that nine in 10 Singaporean millennials are willing to make personal sacrifices to support climate change mitigation efforts. That’s why Tengah is designed to make it as easy and socially desirable as possible for residents to reduce their carbon footprint. One way Tengah will do this is through Eco Boards – digital displays that provide residents with block-level information on energy and water use. These will encourage utilities savings through “friendly competition” among blocks and allow town councils to achieve more efficient estate management. Additionally, the MyTengah app will allow residents to understand household utilities usage, intelligently control air-conditioning usage and buy energy-efficient appliances. Hugh Lim For The Straits Times Climate change and urbanisation are two of the most important challenges facing the world today – and they are inextricably linked. In South-east Asia, one of the most rapidly developing regions in the world, millions are moving out of rural settings into more urbanised areas every year. Sadly, this urbanisation is usually accompanied by an increase in greenhouse gas emissions. However, this need not be the case. Recent studies reveal that residents of denser city centres emit half the greenhouse gas emissions of their suburban neighbours. Moreover, cities have the unique ability to respond to a global issue such as climate change at a more local level, engaging residents directly. Cities are crucibles of innovation and usually offer more immediate and effective communication between the public and decision-makers. Therefore, cities that are well planned and managed may hold the key to balancing economic growth and environmental sustainability. REQUIREMENTS OF SUCCESS On a city scale, urban infrastructure and policies are required to drive emissions reductions through lifestyle choices. Take the example of Tengah, Singapore’s most ambitious smart and sustainable new town to date. The Housing Board, in collaboration with energy utilities provider SP Group, will implement Singapore’s first large-scale residential centralised cooling system there. Such collaborations and initiatives will aid Singapore in achieving its pledge to cap its emissions by 2030 and halve them by 2050. Its success will hinge on three things: power, process and people. Power: Geophysical constraints make it challenging for Singapore to adopt large-scale renewable energy solutions. This makes improving the performance of energy-consuming systems critical. The National Climate Change Secretariat predicts an increase in average surface temperatures of 2.9 deg C to 4.6 deg C under the RCP8.5 greenhouse gas trajectory for the period of 2070 to 2099, relative to 1980 to 2009. (RCP8.5 is a baseline scenario referring to the concentration of carbon that delivers global warming at an average of 8.5 watts per sq m across the planet.) What an increase in average surface temperatures means for Singapore is that there will be a commensurate increase in demand for air-conditioners. The amount of energy used to cool Singapore – which has the highest rate in the South-east Asian region of air-conditioners installed per capita – is projected to grow by 73 per cent between 2010 and 2030. The good news is that Singapore is piloting more energy-efficient technologies, including district cooling systems like the one implemented in the Marina Bay district in 2006, enabling energy savings of up to 40 per cent, according to SP Group. Tengah, which is scaled at around 220 to 300 HDB blocks, will be similarly equipped with a centralised cooling system adapted for residential use. Through centralised cooling, lifetime household energy consumption is expected to be reduced by 30 per cent. The upcoming Punggol Digital District, developed by national industrial infrastructure developer JTC Corporation, will be equipped with a smart energy grid that can lower energy usage, distribute green energy such as solar power seamlessly across the district and detect abnormal energy consumption. In Punggol Digital District, the buildings will be 30 per cent more energy-efficient than conventional commercial buildings, thanks to the sustainable design and smart optimisation enabled by the district’s open digital platform. Process: Sustainable districts can serve as test beds for urban systems innovation, enabling government agencies and industry partners to pilot a suite of complementary policies and actions to tackle greenhouse gas emissions. Take Punggol’s open digital platform, which will collect districtwide data through its network of sensors, including building data (to do with lifts, lighting and occupancy, for example) and environmental data (such as temperature and rainfall). These data sets will allow JTC to optimise resources in real time and fix issues before they become serious problems. The open digital platform’s digital twin technology will also provide an experimental environment for anyone in the district. It will allow industries and researchers to tap the open data to MAKING A DIFFERENCE Tengah and Punggol Digital District are in the vanguard of city-level eco-smartness, but there are ways for everyone to contribute, no matter where in Singapore you live. SP Group is helping its customers to do just that through the My Carbon Footprint and My Green Credits features on the SP Utilities app. These allow customers to track carbon emissions resulting from electricity, water and gas consumption, and match this with the purchase of an equivalent amount of green energy. With the right urban infrastructure and power of knowledge, it will be possible to achieve climate action goals at both the individual and national levels. stopinion@sph.com.sg • Hugh Lim is the executive director of the Centre for Liveable Cities (www.clc.gov.sg), under the Ministry of National Development. Searchhttps://www.spgroup.com.sg/search?tag=smart-city Search Searchhttps://www.spgroup.com.sg/search?tag=smart-city Search [20210430] The Straits Times - What does it mean to be a smart and sustainable cityhttps://www.spgroup.com.sg/dam/jcr:d1eb0dd3-254c-4c02-99d8-9b3da06e5799 What does it mean to be a smart and sustainable city? In the eco-vanguard are Tengah’s innovative cooling system and Punggol’s open digital platform Singapore is piloting more energy-efficient technologies, including district cooling systems like the one implemented in the Marina Bay district (above) in 2006, enabling energy savings of up to 40 per cent, according to energy utilities provider SP Group. Tengah new town will be similarly equipped with a centralised cooling system adapted for residential use. PHOTO: SP GROUP test new concepts of living, working and service delivery for the neighbourhood. In Tengah, numerous initiatives – such as solar photovoltaic installations (which convert sunlight directly into electricity) and charging systems for electric vehicles, along with battery energy storage systems – are planned in an integrated manner. SP Group’s OneTengah digital platform will allow town council and facility operators to better measure, monitor and manage what systems are being deployed. Sustainable districts in a city hold huge promise for turning eco-conscious living into a collaborative endeavour. When such innovations are successfully implemented, the city is able to reap many benefits from systems-level integration and enjoy economies of scale, including energy savings. People: However, the success of these innovations ultimately rests on the people on the ground. Governments and developers can build the necessary infrastructure, but to actually reduce emissions, residents must do their part through individual lifestyle choices. A recent media survey found that nine in 10 Singaporean millennials are willing to make personal sacrifices to support climate change mitigation efforts. That’s why Tengah is designed to make it as easy and socially desirable as possible for residents to reduce their carbon footprint. One way Tengah will do this is through Eco Boards – digital displays that provide residents with block-level information on energy and water use. These will encourage utilities savings through “friendly competition” among blocks and allow town councils to achieve more efficient estate management. Additionally, the MyTengah app will allow residents to understand household utilities usage, intelligently control air-conditioning usage and buy energy-efficient appliances. Hugh Lim For The Straits Times Climate change and urbanisation are two of the most important challenges facing the world today – and they are inextricably linked. In South-east Asia, one of the most rapidly developing regions in the world, millions are moving out of rural settings into more urbanised areas every year. Sadly, this urbanisation is usually accompanied by an increase in greenhouse gas emissions. However, this need not be the case. Recent studies reveal that residents of denser city centres emit half the greenhouse gas emissions of their suburban neighbours. Moreover, cities have the unique ability to respond to a global issue such as climate change at a more local level, engaging residents directly. Cities are crucibles of innovation and usually offer more immediate and effective communication between the public and decision-makers. Therefore, cities that are well planned and managed may hold the key to balancing economic growth and environmental sustainability. REQUIREMENTS OF SUCCESS On a city scale, urban infrastructure and policies are required to drive emissions reductions through lifestyle choices. Take the example of Tengah, Singapore’s most ambitious smart and sustainable new town to date. The Housing Board, in collaboration with energy utilities provider SP Group, will implement Singapore’s first large-scale residential centralised cooling system there. Such collaborations and initiatives will aid Singapore in achieving its pledge to cap its emissions by 2030 and halve them by 2050. Its success will hinge on three things: power, process and people. Power: Geophysical constraints make it challenging for Singapore to adopt large-scale renewable energy solutions. This makes improving the performance of energy-consuming systems critical. The National Climate Change Secretariat predicts an increase in average surface temperatures of 2.9 deg C to 4.6 deg C under the RCP8.5 greenhouse gas trajectory for the period of 2070 to 2099, relative to 1980 to 2009. (RCP8.5 is a baseline scenario referring to the concentration of carbon that delivers global warming at an average of 8.5 watts per sq m across the planet.) What an increase in average surface temperatures means for Singapore is that there will be a commensurate increase in demand for air-conditioners. The amount of energy used to cool Singapore – which has the highest rate in the South-east Asian region of air-conditioners installed per capita – is projected to grow by 73 per cent between 2010 and 2030. The good news is that Singapore is piloting more energy-efficient technologies, including district cooling systems like the one implemented in the Marina Bay district in 2006, enabling energy savings of up to 40 per cent, according to SP Group. Tengah, which is scaled at around 220 to 300 HDB blocks, will be similarly equipped with a centralised cooling system adapted for residential use. Through centralised cooling, lifetime household energy consumption is expected to be reduced by 30 per cent. The upcoming Punggol Digital District, developed by national industrial infrastructure developer JTC Corporation, will be equipped with a smart energy grid that can lower energy usage, distribute green energy such as solar power seamlessly across the district and detect abnormal energy consumption. In Punggol Digital District, the buildings will be 30 per cent more energy-efficient than conventional commercial buildings, thanks to the sustainable design and smart optimisation enabled by the district’s open digital platform. Process: Sustainable districts can serve as test beds for urban systems innovation, enabling government agencies and industry partners to pilot a suite of complementary policies and actions to tackle greenhouse gas emissions. Take Punggol’s open digital platform, which will collect districtwide data through its network of sensors, including building data (to do with lifts, lighting and occupancy, for example) and environmental data (such as temperature and rainfall). These data sets will allow JTC to optimise resources in real time and fix issues before they become serious problems. The open digital platform’s digital twin technology will also provide an experimental environment for anyone in the district. It will allow industries and researchers to tap the open data to MAKING A DIFFERENCE Tengah and Punggol Digital District are in the vanguard of city-level eco-smartness, but there are ways for everyone to contribute, no matter where in Singapore you live. SP Group is helping its customers to do just that through the My Carbon Footprint and My Green Credits features on the SP Utilities app. These allow customers to track carbon emissions resulting from electricity, water and gas consumption, and match this with the purchase of an equivalent amount of green energy. With the right urban infrastructure and power of knowledge, it will be possible to achieve climate action goals at both the individual and national levels. stopinion@sph.com.sg • Hugh Lim is the executive director of the Centre for Liveable Cities (www.clc.gov.sg), under the Ministry of National Development. Searchhttps://www.spgroup.com.sg/search?tag=smart-city Search [20210430] The Straits Times - What does it mean to be a smart and sustainable cityhttps://www.spgroup.com.sg/dam/jcr:d1eb0dd3-254c-4c02-99d8-9b3da06e5799 What does it mean to be a smart and sustainable city? In the eco-vanguard are Tengah’s innovative cooling system and Punggol’s open digital platform Singapore is piloting more energy-efficient technologies, including district cooling systems like the one implemented in the Marina Bay district (above) in 2006, enabling energy savings of up to 40 per cent, according to energy utilities provider SP Group. Tengah new town will be similarly equipped with a centralised cooling system adapted for residential use. PHOTO: SP GROUP test new concepts of living, working and service delivery for the neighbourhood. In Tengah, numerous initiatives – such as solar photovoltaic installations (which convert sunlight directly into electricity) and charging systems for electric vehicles, along with battery energy storage systems – are planned in an integrated manner. SP Group’s OneTengah digital platform will allow town council and facility operators to better measure, monitor and manage what systems are being deployed. Sustainable districts in a city hold huge promise for turning eco-conscious living into a collaborative endeavour. When such innovations are successfully implemented, the city is able to reap many benefits from systems-level integration and enjoy economies of scale, including energy savings. People: However, the success of these innovations ultimately rests on the people on the ground. Governments and developers can build the necessary infrastructure, but to actually reduce emissions, residents must do their part through individual lifestyle choices. A recent media survey found that nine in 10 Singaporean millennials are willing to make personal sacrifices to support climate change mitigation efforts. That’s why Tengah is designed to make it as easy and socially desirable as possible for residents to reduce their carbon footprint. One way Tengah will do this is through Eco Boards – digital displays that provide residents with block-level information on energy and water use. These will encourage utilities savings through “friendly competition” among blocks and allow town councils to achieve more efficient estate management. Additionally, the MyTengah app will allow residents to understand household utilities usage, intelligently control air-conditioning usage and buy energy-efficient appliances. Hugh Lim For The Straits Times Climate change and urbanisation are two of the most important challenges facing the world today – and they are inextricably linked. In South-east Asia, one of the most rapidly developing regions in the world, millions are moving out of rural settings into more urbanised areas every year. Sadly, this urbanisation is usually accompanied by an increase in greenhouse gas emissions. However, this need not be the case. Recent studies reveal that residents of denser city centres emit half the greenhouse gas emissions of their suburban neighbours. Moreover, cities have the unique ability to respond to a global issue such as climate change at a more local level, engaging residents directly. Cities are crucibles of innovation and usually offer more immediate and effective communication between the public and decision-makers. Therefore, cities that are well planned and managed may hold the key to balancing economic growth and environmental sustainability. REQUIREMENTS OF SUCCESS On a city scale, urban infrastructure and policies are required to drive emissions reductions through lifestyle choices. Take the example of Tengah, Singapore’s most ambitious smart and sustainable new town to date. The Housing Board, in collaboration with energy utilities provider SP Group, will implement Singapore’s first large-scale residential centralised cooling system there. Such collaborations and initiatives will aid Singapore in achieving its pledge to cap its emissions by 2030 and halve them by 2050. Its success will hinge on three things: power, process and people. Power: Geophysical constraints make it challenging for Singapore to adopt large-scale renewable energy solutions. This makes improving the performance of energy-consuming systems critical. The National Climate Change Secretariat predicts an increase in average surface temperatures of 2.9 deg C to 4.6 deg C under the RCP8.5 greenhouse gas trajectory for the period of 2070 to 2099, relative to 1980 to 2009. (RCP8.5 is a baseline scenario referring to the concentration of carbon that delivers global warming at an average of 8.5 watts per sq m across the planet.) What an increase in average surface temperatures means for Singapore is that there will be a commensurate increase in demand for air-conditioners. The amount of energy used to cool Singapore – which has the highest rate in the South-east Asian region of air-conditioners installed per capita – is projected to grow by 73 per cent between 2010 and 2030. The good news is that Singapore is piloting more energy-efficient technologies, including district cooling systems like the one implemented in the Marina Bay district in 2006, enabling energy savings of up to 40 per cent, according to SP Group. Tengah, which is scaled at around 220 to 300 HDB blocks, will be similarly equipped with a centralised cooling system adapted for residential use. Through centralised cooling, lifetime household energy consumption is expected to be reduced by 30 per cent. The upcoming Punggol Digital District, developed by national industrial infrastructure developer JTC Corporation, will be equipped with a smart energy grid that can lower energy usage, distribute green energy such as solar power seamlessly across the district and detect abnormal energy consumption. In Punggol Digital District, the buildings will be 30 per cent more energy-efficient than conventional commercial buildings, thanks to the sustainable design and smart optimisation enabled by the district’s open digital platform. Process: Sustainable districts can serve as test beds for urban systems innovation, enabling government agencies and industry partners to pilot a suite of complementary policies and actions to tackle greenhouse gas emissions. Take Punggol’s open digital platform, which will collect districtwide data through its network of sensors, including building data (to do with lifts, lighting and occupancy, for example) and environmental data (such as temperature and rainfall). These data sets will allow JTC to optimise resources in real time and fix issues before they become serious problems. The open digital platform’s digital twin technology will also provide an experimental environment for anyone in the district. It will allow industries and researchers to tap the open data to MAKING A DIFFERENCE Tengah and Punggol Digital District are in the vanguard of city-level eco-smartness, but there are ways for everyone to contribute, no matter where in Singapore you live. SP Group is helping its customers to do just that through the My Carbon Footprint and My Green Credits features on the SP Utilities app. These allow customers to track carbon emissions resulting from electricity, water and gas consumption, and match this with the purchase of an equivalent amount of green energy. With the right urban infrastructure and power of knowledge, it will be possible to achieve climate action goals at both the individual and national levels. stopinion@sph.com.sg • Hugh Lim is the executive director of the Centre for Liveable Cities (www.clc.gov.sg), under the Ministry of National Development. Searchhttps://www.spgroup.com.sg/search?tag=smart-city Search [20210430] The Straits Times - What does it mean to be a smart and sustainable cityhttps://www.spgroup.com.sg/dam/jcr:d1eb0dd3-254c-4c02-99d8-9b3da06e5799 What does it mean to be a smart and sustainable city? In the eco-vanguard are Tengah’s innovative cooling system and Punggol’s open digital platform Singapore is piloting more energy-efficient technologies, including district cooling systems like the one implemented in the Marina Bay district (above) in 2006, enabling energy savings of up to 40 per cent, according to energy utilities provider SP Group. Tengah new town will be similarly equipped with a centralised cooling system adapted for residential use. PHOTO: SP GROUP test new concepts of living, working and service delivery for the neighbourhood. In Tengah, numerous initiatives – such as solar photovoltaic installations (which convert sunlight directly into electricity) and charging systems for electric vehicles, along with battery energy storage systems – are planned in an integrated manner. SP Group’s OneTengah digital platform will allow town council and facility operators to better measure, monitor and manage what systems are being deployed. Sustainable districts in a city hold huge promise for turning eco-conscious living into a collaborative endeavour. When such innovations are successfully implemented, the city is able to reap many benefits from systems-level integration and enjoy economies of scale, including energy savings. People: However, the success of these innovations ultimately rests on the people on the ground. Governments and developers can build the necessary infrastructure, but to actually reduce emissions, residents must do their part through individual lifestyle choices. A recent media survey found that nine in 10 Singaporean millennials are willing to make personal sacrifices to support climate change mitigation efforts. That’s why Tengah is designed to make it as easy and socially desirable as possible for residents to reduce their carbon footprint. One way Tengah will do this is through Eco Boards – digital displays that provide residents with block-level information on energy and water use. These will encourage utilities savings through “friendly competition” among blocks and allow town councils to achieve more efficient estate management. Additionally, the MyTengah app will allow residents to understand household utilities usage, intelligently control air-conditioning usage and buy energy-efficient appliances. Hugh Lim For The Straits Times Climate change and urbanisation are two of the most important challenges facing the world today – and they are inextricably linked. In South-east Asia, one of the most rapidly developing regions in the world, millions are moving out of rural settings into more urbanised areas every year. Sadly, this urbanisation is usually accompanied by an increase in greenhouse gas emissions. However, this need not be the case. Recent studies reveal that residents of denser city centres emit half the greenhouse gas emissions of their suburban neighbours. Moreover, cities have the unique ability to respond to a global issue such as climate change at a more local level, engaging residents directly. Cities are crucibles of innovation and usually offer more immediate and effective communication between the public and decision-makers. Therefore, cities that are well planned and managed may hold the key to balancing economic growth and environmental sustainability. REQUIREMENTS OF SUCCESS On a city scale, urban infrastructure and policies are required to drive emissions reductions through lifestyle choices. Take the example of Tengah, Singapore’s most ambitious smart and sustainable new town to date. The Housing Board, in collaboration with energy utilities provider SP Group, will implement Singapore’s first large-scale residential centralised cooling system there. Such collaborations and initiatives will aid Singapore in achieving its pledge to cap its emissions by 2030 and halve them by 2050. Its success will hinge on three things: power, process and people. Power: Geophysical constraints make it challenging for Singapore to adopt large-scale renewable energy solutions. This makes improving the performance of energy-consuming systems critical. The National Climate Change Secretariat predicts an increase in average surface temperatures of 2.9 deg C to 4.6 deg C under the RCP8.5 greenhouse gas trajectory for the period of 2070 to 2099, relative to 1980 to 2009. (RCP8.5 is a baseline scenario referring to the concentration of carbon that delivers global warming at an average of 8.5 watts per sq m across the planet.) What an increase in average surface temperatures means for Singapore is that there will be a commensurate increase in demand for air-conditioners. The amount of energy used to cool Singapore – which has the highest rate in the South-east Asian region of air-conditioners installed per capita – is projected to grow by 73 per cent between 2010 and 2030. The good news is that Singapore is piloting more energy-efficient technologies, including district cooling systems like the one implemented in the Marina Bay district in 2006, enabling energy savings of up to 40 per cent, according to SP Group. Tengah, which is scaled at around 220 to 300 HDB blocks, will be similarly equipped with a centralised cooling system adapted for residential use. Through centralised cooling, lifetime household energy consumption is expected to be reduced by 30 per cent. The upcoming Punggol Digital District, developed by national industrial infrastructure developer JTC Corporation, will be equipped with a smart energy grid that can lower energy usage, distribute green energy such as solar power seamlessly across the district and detect abnormal energy consumption. In Punggol Digital District, the buildings will be 30 per cent more energy-efficient than conventional commercial buildings, thanks to the sustainable design and smart optimisation enabled by the district’s open digital platform. Process: Sustainable districts can serve as test beds for urban systems innovation, enabling government agencies and industry partners to pilot a suite of complementary policies and actions to tackle greenhouse gas emissions. Take Punggol’s open digital platform, which will collect districtwide data through its network of sensors, including building data (to do with lifts, lighting and occupancy, for example) and environmental data (such as temperature and rainfall). These data sets will allow JTC to optimise resources in real time and fix issues before they become serious problems. The open digital platform’s digital twin technology will also provide an experimental environment for anyone in the district. It will allow industries and researchers to tap the open data to MAKING A DIFFERENCE Tengah and Punggol Digital District are in the vanguard of city-level eco-smartness, but there are ways for everyone to contribute, no matter where in Singapore you live. SP Group is helping its customers to do just that through the My Carbon Footprint and My Green Credits features on the SP Uti
[20211202] Media Release - SP signs MOU with Banpu NEXThttps://www.spgroup.com.sg/dam/spgroup/wcm/connect/spgrp/6909d843-ce04-42b4-8e26-0f577fce7d00/%5B20211202%5D+Media+Release+-+SP+signs+MOU+with+Banpu+NEXT.pdf?MOD=AJPERES&CVID=
Press Release December 2, 2021 SP Group partners with Banpu NEXT to offer clean energy solutions across Asia Pacific “Banpu NEXT” and “SP Group” signed a memorandum of understanding (MoU) to collaborate on developing clean energy solutions in Asia Pacific - led by Mrs. Somruedee Chaimongkol Chief Executive Officer of Banpu and Banpu NEXT and Mr. Stanley Huang, Group Chief Executive Officer of SP Group are the signatories, Mr. James Rama Phataminviphas, Group Senior Vice President - Energy Technology, Mr. Suwit Pruckwattananon, Senior Vice President - External Relations of Banpu NEXT, Mr. Brandon Chia, Managing Director, SEA & Australia, Sustainable Energy Solutions, SP Group and Mr. John Chng, Director, SEA & Australia, Sustainable Energy Solutions, SP Group are the witnesses Singapore / Bangkok, 2 December, 2021 – SP Group (SP), a leading utilities group in Singapore and Asia Pacific has signed a memorandum of understanding (MoU) with Banpu NEXT to collaborate on developing sustainable energy and smart city solutions across Thailand and the Asia Pacific region. Banpu NEXT is a subsidiary of Banpu PCL and a leading smart clean energy solutions provider in Thailand and Asia Pacific with a strong portfolio of renewable energy and energy storage businesses across the region, including solar farms in China, Japan, the United States, and Australia; wind farms in Vietnam; energy storage business in Singapore; and smart city development projects in Thailand’s Phuket and Chonburi provinces. The partnership will consolidate the expertise and strengths of both companies in clean and sustainable energy solutions to drive urban decarbonisation efforts in the region. Both parties will explore the applications of district cooling systems, cross-border renewable energy certificates (RECs) platform and smart city solutions to support the development of sustainable and smart energy cities in the region. With the global clean energy market expected to reach $1,977.6 billion by 2030 and the Asia-Pacific region estimated to have the highest share of the market over the next decade with a compounded annual growth rate of 9.6 per cent annually, this partnership between Banpu NEXT and SP aims to facilitate this demand for innovative clean energy solutions. 1 Mrs. Somruedee Chaimongkol, Chief Executive Officer of Banpu PCL and Banpu NEXT Co., Ltd., said, “Banpu NEXT operates under Banpu Greener & Smarter strategy with a focus on providing ‘Smart Energy Solutions’. We drive growth of our five core businesses: Renewable Energy, Energy Storage, Energy Trading, e- Mobility and Smart Energy. Our portfolio of customers spans across numerous business and industry sectors. Banpu NEXT and SP Group share a similar vision to popularize clean energy and offer tech-driven smart energy solutions for sustainability to enhance business and economic development and contribute to sustainable betterment of people’s lives. Together with SP Group, we will explore partnership opportunities to top up our business capability and expand high-potential businesses to overseas markets in Asia Pacific, such as energy management service for district cooling systems, cross-border renewable energy certificates platform, and smart city development. These three areas of collaboration are aimed at achieving more efficient management of clean energy across system design and development to bring even better results in energy efficiency to customers of both partners. The customers can therefore expect lower energy costs, higher profits, and better economy of scale. By combining the expertise of Banpu NEXT in clean energy solution and digital platform designs with region-wide business network of SP Group, we will add new strengths to the businesses of both partners.” Mr. Stanley Huang, Group Chief Executive Officer of SP Group, said, “We are pleased to partner Banpu NEXT to support the clean energy ambitions of Thailand and the Asia Pacific region. Our combined expertise in developing and implementing smart and clean energy solutions will offer cities and districts more low-carbon, high-efficiency solutions to support their sustainable growth. Contributing to the region’s clean energy transition is also integral to our vision of empowering the future of energy and building a sustainable future for all.” 1 Source of information: Allied Market Research - https://www.alliedmarketresearch.com/renewable-energymarket?force_isolation=true SP Group designed, built, and operates the world’s largest underground district cooling network in the Marina Bay district, Singapore which has been in operation since 2006, powering buildings in the district with an energy efficient air-conditioning solution to save energy and cost. SP’s district cooling expertise and technology have since been adopted for Raffles City Chongqing in China – an iconic integrated development comprising a shopping mall, a hotel, office towers and residences. SP also launched one of the world’s first blockchain powered RECs platform to help customers achieve their sustainability goals by ensuring that the electricity they consume comes from renewable sources. Combined with Banpu NEXT’s large, diversified portfolio of sustainable energy businesses and ground-breaking projects in renewable energy, energy storage systems, energy management system, smart energy solutions, and smart cities and campuses, this strategic partnership will strengthen both companies’ clean energy ambitions. This includes an enhanced business ecosystem, new competitive advantages, expanded business network and more extensive regional portfolios, to meet the clean energy demands of the future. - Ends - About Banpu NEXT Banpu NEXT Co., Ltd., a subsidiary of Banpu PCL., is a leading “Smart Energy Solutions” provider in Asia-Pacific with a vision of “Innovating Infinite Energy Solutions to All”. The company aims to create business growth in line with future energy trends and respond to the lifestyle of modern consumers. With customers in mind, Banpu NEXT employs human-centric and datadriven approach, combining our expertise in clean energy solutions with energy technology and hardware to develop “Smart Energy Solutions for Sustainability”. Comprising of Smart Data Analytics, Smart Energy Generation, Smart Energy Storage, Smart Energy Utilization, and Smart Circular Economy, these solutions serve as the growth agent for our five business groups—Renewable Energy, Energy Storage, Energy Trading, e-Mobility, and Smart Energy—through which we provide endto-end services with great value for money, reliability, and eco-friendliness to support sustainable development of all businesses. More information https://www.banpunext.co.th About SP Group SP Group is a leading utilities group in the Asia Pacific, empowering the future of energy with low-carbon, smart energy solutions for its customers. It owns and operates electricity and gas transmission and distribution businesses in Singapore and Australia, and sustainable energy solutions in Singapore and China. As Singapore’s national grid operator, about 1.6 million industrial, commercial and residential customers benefit from its worldclass transmission, distribution and market support services. These networks are amongst the most reliable and cost-effective world-wide. Beyond traditional utilities services, SP Group provides a suite of sustainable and renewable energy solutions such as microgrids, cooling and heating systems for business districts and residential townships, solar energy solutions, electric vehicle fast charging and digital energy solutions for customers in Singapore and the region. For more information, please visit spgroup.com.sg or for follow us on Facebook at fb.com/SPGroupSG, on LinkedIn at spgrp.sg/linkedin and on Twitter @SPGroupSG. ####
SP Group partners with Banpu NEXT to offer clean energy solutions across Asia Pacifichttps://www.spgroup.com.sg/about-us/media-resources/news-and-media-releases/SP-Group-partners-with-Banpu-NEXT-to-offer-clean-energy-solutions-across-Asia-Pacific
Media Release SP Group partners with Banpu NEXT to offer clean energy solutions across Asia Pacific “Banpu NEXT” and “SP Group” signed a memorandum of understanding (MoU) to collaborate on developing clean energy solutions in Asia Pacific - led by Mrs. Somruedee Chaimongkol Chief Executive Officer of Banpu and Banpu NEXT and Mr. Stanley Huang, Group Chief Executive Officer of SP Group are the signatories, Mr. James Rama Phataminviphas, Group Senior Vice President - Energy Technology, Mr. Suwit Pruckwattananon, Senior Vice President - External Relations of Banpu NEXT, Mr. Brandon Chia, Managing Director, SEA & Australia, Sustainable Energy Solutions, SP Group and Mr. John Chng, Director, SEA & Australia, Sustainable Energy Solutions, SP Group are the witnesses Singapore / Bangkok, 2 December, 2021 – SP Group (SP), a leading utilities group in Singapore and Asia Pacific has signed a memorandum of understanding (MoU) with Banpu NEXT to collaborate on developing sustainable energy and smart city solutions across Thailand and the Asia Pacific region. Banpu NEXT is a subsidiary of Banpu PCL and a leading smart clean energy solutions provider in Thailand and Asia Pacific with a strong portfolio of renewable energy and energy storage businesses across the region, including solar farms in China, Japan, the United States, and Australia; wind farms in Vietnam; energy storage business in Singapore; and smart city development projects in Thailand’s Phuket and Chonburi provinces. The partnership will consolidate the expertise and strengths of both companies in clean and sustainable energy solutions to drive urban decarbonisation efforts in the region. Both parties will explore the applications of district cooling systems, cross-border renewable energy certificates (RECs) platform and smart city solutions to support the development of sustainable and smart energy cities in the region. With the global clean energy market expected to reach $1,977.6 billion by 2030 and the Asia-Pacific region estimated to have the highest share of the market over the next decade with a compounded annual growth rate of 9.6 per cent annually, this partnership between Banpu NEXT and SP aims to facilitate this demand for innovative clean energy solutions.1 Mrs. Somruedee Chaimongkol, Chief Executive Officer of Banpu PCL and Banpu NEXT Co., Ltd., said, “Banpu NEXT operates under Banpu Greener & Smarter strategy with a focus on providing ‘Smart Energy Solutions’. We drive growth of our five core businesses: Renewable Energy, Energy Storage, Energy Trading, eMobility and Smart Energy. Our portfolio of customers spans across numerous business and industry sectors. Banpu NEXT and SP Group share a similar vision to popularize clean energy and offer tech-driven smart energy solutions for sustainability to enhance business and economic development and contribute to sustainable betterment of people’s lives. Together with SP Group, we will explore partnership opportunities to top up our business capability and expand high-potential businesses to overseas markets in Asia Pacific, such as energy management service for district cooling systems, cross-border renewable energy certificates platform, and smart city development. These three areas of collaboration are aimed at achieving more efficient management of clean energy across system design and development to bring even better results in energy efficiency to customers of both partners. The customers can therefore expect lower energy costs, higher profits, and better economy of scale. By combining the expertise of Banpu NEXT in clean energy solution and digital platform designs with region-wide business network of SP Group, we will add new strengths to the businesses of both partners.” Mr. Stanley Huang, Group Chief Executive Officer of SP Group, said, “We are pleased to partner Banpu NEXT to support the clean energy ambitions of Thailand and the Asia Pacific region. Our combined expertise in developing and implementing smart and clean energy solutions will offer cities and districts more low-carbon, high-efficiency solutions to support their sustainable growth. Contributing to the region’s clean energy transition is also integral to our vision of empowering the future of energy and building a sustainable future for all.” SP Group designed, built, and operates the world’s largest underground district cooling network in the Marina Bay district, Singapore which has been in operation since 2006, powering buildings in the district with an energy efficient air-conditioning solution to save energy and cost. SP’s district cooling expertise and technology have since been adopted for Raffles City Chongqing in China – an iconic integrated development comprising a shopping mall, a hotel, office towers and residences. SP also launched one of the world’s first blockchain powered RECs platform to help customers achieve their sustainability goals by ensuring that the electricity they consume comes from renewable sources. Combined with Banpu NEXT’s large, diversified portfolio of sustainable energy businesses and ground-breaking projects in renewable energy, energy storage systems, energy management system, smart energy solutions, and smart cities and campuses, this strategic partnership will strengthen both companies’ clean energy ambitions. This includes an enhanced business ecosystem, new competitive advantages, expanded business network and more extensive regional portfolios, to meet the clean energy demands of the future. - Ends - About Banpu NEXT Banpu NEXT Co., Ltd., a subsidiary of Banpu PCL., is a leading “Smart Energy Solutions” provider in Asia-Pacific with a vision of “Innovating Infinite Energy Solutions to All”. The company aims to create business growth in line with future energy trends and respond to the lifestyle of modern consumers. With customers in mind, Banpu NEXT employs human-centric and data- driven approach, combining our expertise in clean energy solutions with energy technology and hardware to develop “Smart Energy Solutions for Sustainability”. Comprising of Smart Data Analytics, Smart Energy Generation, Smart Energy Storage, Smart Energy Utilization, and Smart Circular Economy, these solutions serve as the growth agent for our five business groups—Renewable Energy, Energy Storage, Energy Trading, e-Mobility, and Smart Energy—through which we provide end- to-end services with great value for money, reliability, and eco-friendliness to support sustainable development of all businesses. More information https://www.banpunext.co.th About SP Group SP Group is a leading utilities group in the Asia Pacific, empowering the future of energy with low-carbon, smart energy solutions for its customers. It owns and operates electricity and gas transmission and distribution businesses in Singapore and Australia, and sustainable energy solutions in Singapore and China. As Singapore’s national grid operator, about 1.6 million industrial, commercial and residential customers benefit from its world- class transmission, distribution and market support services. These networks are amongst the most reliable and cost-effective world-wide. Beyond traditional utilities services, SP Group provides a suite of sustainable and renewable energy solutions such as microgrids, cooling and heating systems for business districts and residential townships, solar energy solutions, electric vehicle fast charging and digital energy solutions for customers in Singapore and the region. For more information, please visit spgroup.com.sg or for follow us on Facebook at fb.com/SPGroupSG, on LinkedIn at spgrp.sg/linkedin and on Twitter @SPGroupSG. #### 1 Source of information: Allied Market Research - https://www.alliedmarketresearch.com/renewable-energy-market
Overseas Chinahttps://www.spgroup.com.sg/about-us/international/china
OverviewChinaVietnamAustralia China With China leading sustainable development on the global stage, this presents a new growth engine for SP Group to deploy district cooling, heating and integrated energy solutions to meet customers' sustainability goals. Following our first foray in China in 2015 and partnerships taking root in major cities, we have built up a strong project pipeline and set up three offices - in Shanghai as headquarters, Guangzhou and Chongqing. Visit our China website Raffles City Chongqing SP Group [SP] inked a 20-year deal in 2015 to design, build, own and operate a district heating and cooling system for CapitaLand's Raffles City Chongqing, an iconic integrated development comprising a shopping mall, a hotel, office towers, residences and service residences. SP's operations commenced in September 2019, enabling Raffles City Chongqing to reduce energy consumption by more than 40 per cent, compared to conventional building chiller plants. Chongqing Sino-Singapore Energy Services In 2021, SP Group acquired a 40 per cent stake in Sino-French Energy Services Co. Ltd (SFES) in Chongqing to form Sino-Singapore Energy Services Co. Ltd (SSES). This is SP's first acquisition of energy assets in China, growing the company's China presence with sustainable energy solutions.​ SSES is the market leader for Combined Cooling Heating and Power (CCHP) solutions in Chongqing. It operates CCHP solutions deployed in three of the city's hospitals as well as a district cooling and heating plant that serves the Chongqing Danzishi Central Business District.​ The acquisition strengthens SP's district cooling and heating presence in Chongqing and expands our capabilities in CCHP offerings as we grow our sustainable energy solutions in China. Guangzhou Knowledge City SP Group is working with the Sino-Singapore Guangzhou Knowledge City Investment and Development Co. Ltd to provide district cooling and heating, and smart energy solutions at the China-Singapore Guangzhou Knowledge City [GKC]. The implementation of district cooling and heating networks, and other sustainable energy solutions such as solar, energy storage, energy efficiency and integrated energy management systems will enable GKC to enjoy substantial energy and cost savings. This will translate to a cleaner and more sustainable energy future for GKC and for Guangzhou city. State Grid Chongqing Integrated Energy Services SP Group and State Grid Chongqing Integrated Energy Services formed a partnership to jointly develop integrated energy projects that deliver smart, efficient energy management solutions. This is aimed at meeting the evolving operational needs and green targets of customers in Chongqing, China. Through this collaboration both parties aim to drive innovation and capabilities towards achieving carbon neutrality for the city by providing customers with a comprehensive suite of clean and efficient energy solutions. Smart Eco-District In Chengdu SP Group is partnering the People's Government of Wuhou District, Chengdu, to transform the largest of five city centre districts in Chengdu, to a smart eco-district. SP will serve as the sustainable energy solutions partner to the district government and support the city's roadmap to carbon neutrality by developing and implementing technologies and digital solutions such as advanced data analytics and artificial intelligence tools. In the first phase under the partnership, SP will design, build, own and operate an integrated energy solution that includes district cooling and heating system, smart metering, energy management and monitoring for the International Urban Design Centre [IUDC] in Wuhou over the next 25 years. The solution will provide IUDC with real-time insights on their energy and utilities usage data to help them optimise building performance, energy efficiency and comfort for end-users. Photo credit: Three Kingdoms Themed Innovation Park Management Committee of Wuhou District, Chengdu.
SP Group partners Wuhou District Government to develop smart eco-district in Chengduhttps://www.spgroup.com.sg/about-us/media-resources/news-and-media-releases/SP-Group-partners-Wuhou-District-Government-to-develop-smart-eco-district-in-Chengdu
Media Release SP Group partners Wuhou District Government to develop smart eco-district in Chengdu Partnership with district government will transform Wuhou into the benchmark for smart and sustainable districts in Chengdu. Smart energy solutions to be deployed at the International Urban Design Centre from 2021. Chengdu, China and Singapore, 13 July 2021 – SP Group (SP) announced a partnership with People’s Government of Wuhou District, Chengdu, to transform the largest of five city centre districts in Chengdu, to a smart eco-district. Through this partnership, SP will deploy smart and sustainable energy solutions to accelerate the city’s urban renewal masterplan. Wuhou is a mature government and civic district identified for revitalisation in Chengdu’s urban renewal masterplan. The masterplan aims to rejuvenate and transform existing buildings and districts into sustainable ecosystems that drive economic growth, innovation and cultural engagement for Chengdu. At a signing ceremony witnessed by Ms Xiong Miao, Head of International Economic Trade Partnerships, Chengdu Commerce Bureau; Ms Lin Li, District Deputy Secretary and District Mayor, People’s Government of Wuhou District, Chengdu; and Ms Foo An Gie, Regional Group Director, West China, Enterprise Singapore, SP Group inked two Memorandums of Understanding (MOU) and was appointed the energy and building solutions partner for International Urban Design Centre (IUDC) in Wuhou, Chengdu. Under the MOUs, SP will serve as the sustainable energy solutions partner to the district government with the objective of establishing the district as the benchmark for smart eco-districts in Chengdu. With an estimated rejuvenation pipeline of over 630,000 sqm (gross floor area) over the next five years, the collaboration will explore a wide range of solutions to help the city meet future infrastructural demands in a sustainable way. This includes developing and implementing technologies and digital solutions such as advanced data analytics and artificial intelligence tools to support the city’s roadmap to carbon neutrality. In the first phase under the partnership, SP will design, build, own and operate an integrated energy solution that includes district cooling and heating system, smart metering, energy management and monitoring for IUDC over the next 25 years, at an estimated total contract value of 110 million (SGD). The solution will provide building owners with real-time insights on their energy and utilities usage data to help them optimise building performance, energy efficiency and comfort for end- users. IUDC consists of four existing buildings with an estimated gross floor area of 48,000 sqm. Group Chief Executive Officer of SP Group, Mr Stanley Huang, said, “Chengdu is a key growth engine in southwestern China and an important hi-tech hub. We are excited to partner the Wuhou district government to create a sustainable, livable and vibrant city centre. Over time, the ability to ensure adaptive reuse of established buildings to meet new needs becomes critical. Leveraging our experience in Singapore and China, we will implement green energy technology and digital solutions to push the limits of buildings’ energy efficiency and performance standards.” In China, SP Group invested, designed, and operates Raffles City Chongqing’s energy-efficient cooling and heating system since 2019 to deliver energy savings for the customer. SP also established a joint venture in August 2020 to develop district cooling, heating and integrated energy solutions that will help the China-Singapore Guangzhou Knowledge City (CSGKC) achieve energy savings and efficiency targets. SP Group currently has three offices in China (Guangzhou Chongqing and Chengdu), with its China headquarters located in Shanghai. Architect’s impression of the International Urban Design Centre after redevelopment (Source: Three Kingdoms Themed Innovation Park Management Committee of Wuhou District, Chengdu)
SP+Group+to+Develop+Wuhou+Chengdu+Smart+Eco-District.pdfhttps://www.spgroup.com.sg/dam/spgroup/wcm/connect/spgrp/2464d6e9-09ec-4ce8-b221-89096899d38e/SP+Group+to+Develop+Wuhou+Chengdu+Smart+Eco-District.pdf?MOD=AJPERES&CVID=
SP GROUP PARTNERS WUHOU DISTRICT GOVERNMENT TO DEVELOP SMART ECO-DISTRICT IN CHENGDU • Partnership with district government will transform Wuhou into the benchmark for smart and sustainable districts in Chengdu. • Smart energy solutions to be deployed at the International Urban Design Centre from 2021. Chengdu, China and Singapore, 13 July 2021 – SP Group (SP) announced a partnership with People’s Government of Wuhou District, Chengdu, to transform the largest of five city centre districts in Chengdu, to a smart eco-district. Through this partnership, SP will deploy smart and sustainable energy solutions to accelerate the city’s urban renewal masterplan. Wuhou is a mature government and civic district identified for revitalisation in Chengdu’s urban renewal masterplan. The masterplan aims to rejuvenate and transform existing buildings and districts into sustainable ecosystems that drive economic growth, innovation and cultural engagement for Chengdu. At a signing ceremony witnessed by Ms Xiong Miao, Head of International Economic Trade Partnerships, Chengdu Commerce Bureau; Ms Lin Li, District Deputy Secretary and District Mayor, People’s Government of Wuhou District, Chengdu; and Ms Foo An Gie, Regional Group Director, West China, Enterprise Singapore, SP Group inked two Memorandums of Understanding (MOU) and was appointed the energy and building solutions partner for International Urban Design Centre (IUDC) in Wuhou, Chengdu. Under the MOUs, SP will serve as the sustainable energy solutions partner to the district government with the objective of establishing the district as the benchmark for smart eco-districts in Chengdu. With an estimated rejuvenation pipeline of over 630,000 sqm (gross floor area) over the next five years, the collaboration will explore a wide range of solutions to help the city meet future infrastructural demands in a sustainable way. This includes developing and implementing technologies and digital solutions such as advanced data analytics and artificial intelligence tools to support the city’s roadmap to carbon neutrality. 1 In the first phase under the partnership, SP will design, build, own and operate an integrated energy solution that includes district cooling and heating system, smart metering, energy management and monitoring for IUDC over the next 25 years, at an estimated total contract value of 110 million (SGD). The solution will provide building owners with real-time insights on their energy and utilities usage data to help them optimise building performance, energy efficiency and comfort for endusers. IUDC consists of four existing buildings with an estimated gross floor area of 48,000 sqm. Group Chief Executive Officer of SP Group, Mr Stanley Huang, said, “Chengdu is a key growth engine in southwestern China and an important hi-tech hub. We are excited to partner the Wuhou district government to create a sustainable, livable and vibrant city centre. Over time, the ability to ensure adaptive reuse of established buildings to meet new needs becomes critical. Leveraging our experience in Singapore and China, we will implement green energy technology and digital solutions to push the limits of buildings’ energy efficiency and performance standards.” In China, SP Group invested, designed, and operates Raffles City Chongqing’s energy-efficient cooling and heating system since 2019 to deliver energy savings for the customer. SP also established a joint venture in August 2020 to develop district cooling, heating and integrated energy solutions that will help the China-Singapore Guangzhou Knowledge City (CSGKC) achieve energy savings and efficiency targets. SP Group currently has three offices in China (Guangzhou Chongqing and Chengdu), with its China headquarters located in Shanghai. 2 Architect’s impression of the International Urban Design Centre after redevelopment (Source: Three Kingdoms Themed Innovation Park Management Committee of Wuhou District, Chengdu) -Ends- 3 About SP Group SP Group is a leading utilities group in the Asia Pacific, enabling a low-carbon, smart energy future for its customers. It owns and operates electricity and gas transmission and distribution businesses in Singapore and Australia, and sustainable energy solutions in Singapore and China. As Singapore’s national grid operator, about 1.6 million industrial, commercial and residential customers benefit from its world-class transmission, distribution and market support services. These networks are amongst the most reliable and cost-effective world-wide. Beyond traditional utilities services, SP Group provides a suite of renewable and sustainable energy solutions including solar energy solutions, microgrids, cooling and heating systems for business districts and residential townships, electric vehicle fast charging and digital energy solutions for customers in Singapore and the region. For more information, please visit spgroup.com.sg or follow us on Facebook at fb.com/SPGroupSG, on LinkedIn at spgrp.sg/linkedin and on Twitter @SPGroupSG. 4
[20200831] The Straits Times Online - S'pore aims to work more closely with Guangdong in finance, talent exchange and aviation_Ong Ye Kunghttps://www.spgroup.com.sg/dam/jcr:40ceecc6-19f0-4906-9bd6-9e3dbb5698d9
THE STRAITS TIMES Xi says China to step up efforts to fight 'splittism' in Tibet Two injured after ventilation duct falls from cinema hall ceiling in Nex shopping mall Get $206 worth of free gifts when you buy the NEW Samsung SG Sponsored S'pore aims to work more closely with Guangdong in finance, talent exchange and aviation: Ong Ye Kung Besides financial services, Singapore Transport Minister Ong Ye Kung also called for more talent exchanges between Singapore and Guangdong. PHOTO: ENTERPRISE SINGAPORE � PUBLISHED AUG 31, 2020, 3:11 PM SGT � Prisca Ang ( mailto:prisang@sph.com.sg) SINGAPORE - Singapore aims to deepen collaboration with China's Guangdong province in several key areas, including in financial services, talent exchange and aviation. At the Singapore-Guangdong Collaboration Council (SGCC) on Monday (Aug 31), both sides pledged to work together to s trengthen economic relations. Singapore firms and their partners signed 15 agreements at the annual meeting, which was conducted by video conference this year. Co-chaired by Singapore Transport Minister Ong Ye Kung and Guangdong Governor Ma Xingrui, it was the first provincial business council meeting between Singapore an be convened amid the Covid-19 pandemic. Mr Ong told the meeting there was scope for Singapore and Guangdong to work together in green finance, fintech, disaster risk insurance and Reits (real estate investment structuring. Besides financial services, he also called for more talent exchanges between Singapore and Guangdong. Mr Ong, who was previously education minister , signed an agreement with China last year on the Youth Interns Exchange Scheme, which allows up to 500 Singaporean f students and recent graduates from universities and polytechnics each year to secure visas for internships with China-based companies. The agreement allowed for a reciprocal arrangement for Chinese students in Singapore. "We had hoped to see the first batch of internship exchanges earlier this year, but Covid-19 made this challenging. Nonetheless, with our Singapore-China fast lane in place to facilitate internship exchanges for students very soon, especially with Guangdong, once the implementation agreement on (the scheme) is signed," said Mr Ong. Courtesy call between Guangdong Governor Ma Xingrui (on screen) and Minister Ong Ye Kung (far right). PHOTO: ENTERPRISE SINGAPORE On aviation, Mr Ong noted that China was the first country with which Singapore launched a "fast lane" arrangement for short-term and essential travel. Singapore is the fi in South-east Asia with such an arrangement with China. On the sidelines of the meeting, Mr Ong told reporters that the quota of seats on flights under the fast lane arrangement - including 500 seats across two flights per week b Singapore and Guangdong's capital Guangzhou - was "very underused". "These are things that we will work on and officials will discuss in the coming months, and we hope we will have good progress," he said. Besides these areas, Mr Ong noted that two bilateral projects - the China-Singapore Guangzhou Knowledge City and the Singapore-China (Shenzhen) Smart City Initiative made steady progress in the past year. This year marks the 10th anniversary of the China-Singapore Guangzhou Knowledge City, and Singapore aims to partner the city in its long-term development in areas su solutions and biomedicine. For example, local medical technology start-up Star3D Material Development Company signed a memorandum of understanding with the Sino-Singapore Guangzhou Kn City Investment and Development Co to further develop and commercialise the use of dental 3D technology in China. The firm, which isbased in Singapore and has a factory in Shanghai, aims to set up a joint laboratory and research platform, and introduce projects in the digital dental field general manager Chen Baiqun. The Singapore-China (Shenzhen) Smart City Initiative focuses on three key areas - digital connectivity, innovation and entrepreneurship and tech talent exchange and dev and promotes greater ease of access to market opportunities in the Greater Bay Area and South-east Asia. Guangdong, China's most prosperous province, lies at the heart of the Greater Bay Area - a mega economic zone that includes nine cities in the province, Hong Kong and M In 2019, bilateral trade between Singapore and Guangdong grew 1.9 per cent year-on-year to reach US$19 billion (S$25.8 billion). In the first half of 2020, bilateral trade rea US$8.06 billion. There were more than 3,100 Singapore projects in the province as of December last year, with cumulative investments of US$13.1 billion. Beyond the key cities of Guangzhou and Shenzhen, Singapore businesses have also ventured to new Greater Bay Area cities such as Huizhou, tapping on opportunities in smart city solutions and financial services. The businesses include Keppel Data Centres, which is collaborating with China's Country Garden Holdings and Shenzhen Huateng Intelligent Technology to develop the data centre project in Huizhou's Tonghu Smart City. It is Keppel's first greenfield data centre development in China, said a Keppel Data Centres spokesman. National power grid operator SP Group has also entered into a joint venture agreement with the Sino-Singapore Guangzhou Knowledge City Investment and Developmen establish a company focused on district cooling, heating and integrated energy projects in Guangzhou. The project is SP Group's first foray into southern China. Mr Stanley Huang, group chief executive officer of SP Group, said: "Together, we aim to enable customers in China to enjoy a sustainable, low-carbon future." SPH Digital News / Copyright © 2020 Singapore Press Holdings Ltd. Co. Regn. No. 198402868E. All rights reserved
Sustainabilityhttps://www.spgroup.com.sg/about-us/media-resources/energy-hub/sustainability/driving-urban-decarbonisation-efforts-in-thailand-and-asia-pacific
SP Energy HubAnnual ReportReliabilitySustainabilityInnovation Driving urban decarbonisation efforts in Thailand and Asia Pacific SUSTAINABILITY Our partnership with Banpu Next will empower a clean energy future in Thailand and Asia Pacific. SP and Banpu Next recently signed an MOU to develop sustainable and smart city solutions in Thailand and the Asia Pacific. This will tap on the expertise of both companies in clean and sustainable energy solutions to drive urban decarbonisation efforts in the region. Both companies will explore the applications of district cooling systems, cross-border renewable energy certificates (RECs) platform and other low-carbon, high efficiency solutions to support sustainable growth.  Banpu Next is a subsidiary of Banpu PCL, a leading smart clean energy solutions provider in Thailand and Asia Pacific with a strong portfolio of renewable energy and energy storage businesses across the region, including solar farms in China, Japan, the United States and Australia; wind farms in Vietnam; energy storage business in Singapore; and smart city development projects in Thailand’s Phuket and Chonburi provinces. — 2 December 2021 TAGS SMART CITYSUSTAINABILITYRECSDISTRICT COOLING YOU MIGHT BE INTERESTED TO READ SP Group’s Integrated Energy Solutions to Power Rangsit University’s Green Energy Transformation SP is partnering Rangsit University (RSU) in Thailand to transform RSU’s main campus into a smart energy, low-carbon academic environment. Empowering change Jerome Choong shares the extent of work behind the scenes that goes towards upholding Singapore’s electricity network reliability, while Jennifer Ong elaborates on SP’s expansion into overseas markets. Empowering Green Capabilities Satinderpal Singh and Fong Yi Kit deal with the polarising "hot" and "cold" elements at work, but share one thing in common: empowering organisations with tools to create a low carbon, smart energy Singapore.
Category: Sustainability
[27062017] The Business Times - Digital transformation in the spotlighthttps://www.spgroup.com.sg/dam/jcr:6a35cb0a-a870-450d-98e9-5f8c33f39677
The Business Times | Tuesday, June 27, 2017 | Digital transformation in the spotlight Panel members: ■ Prashant Agarwal, Director, AIA Edge (Group Innovation) ■ Tan Yoong Heng, Singapore Office Leader, ARUP ■ Chia Hock Lai, President of Singapore FinTech Association ■ Philip Heah, Senior Director (Next Generation Infrastructure & SMEs), Development Group, IMDA ■ Lai Weng Yew, Vice-President, Business Application Services, NCS ■ Neo Chia Yann, Director, Consulting Practice, Business Application Services, NCS ■ Tamsin Greulich-Smith, Chief, Smart Health Leadership Centre ■ Bernard Leong, Head of Post Office Network and Digital Services, Singapore Post ■ Chang Sau Sheong, Managing Director, Digital Technology, SP Group ■ Yeo Choon Chong, Deputy CEO, Urban Development, Surbana Moderator: Poon King Wang, Director, Lee Kuan Yew Centre for Innovative Cities, SUTD SPONTANEITY can easily go wrong. But this was not the case at the second BT–NCS roundtable discussion. Immediately after host Lai Weng Yew, vice-president, Business Application Services at NCS, welcomed the panelists, the exchange of views at this discussion was free-flowing and easygoing. The topic of the discussion was on point about what companies are facing today – Transformative Leadership in the Age of Digital Disruption. The roundtable was moderated by Poon King Wang, director, Lee Kuan Yew Centre for Innovative Cities at the Singapore University of Technology and Design (SUTD). During the discussion, the terms “digital transformation” and “digital disruption” came up frequently, but Mr Poon defined that digital transformation is generally the response to digital disruption. While the participants at the discussion may have been technology leaders from the public and private sectors, their focus was resolutely centred on people – their employees and customers. Some of their concerns were guiding their teams through the ongoing digital transformation and how to avoid isolating their customers along the way. The speakers agreed that digital transformation was not easy to implement to bring about the desired results. PEOPLE MATTER Leaders have to cultivate support for transformation at various levels of an organisation. Bernard Leong, head, post office network and digital services, Singapore Post (SingPost) said: “People love to talk about transformation, but they don’t love to change.” Prashant Agarwal, director, AIA Edge (Group Innovation) added: “(It) is natural to look for excuses to hang on to what one knows.” Tamsin Greulich-Smith of NUS-ISS, Smart Health Leadership Centre, noted that in the approach taken with the Smart Nation initiative, the government has set out the vision and plays the role of enabler while encouraging people to drive the changes. She said it’s an exciting approach to cascading sustainable change, but some people need time to adjust to it, perhaps feeling they have been put into the driver’s seat without instructions. Leaders have to be customer-centric too. Neo Chia Yann, director, Consulting Practice, Business Application Services at NCS, gave an example of how her team is working with their customers in their digital transformation. That is using digital solutions to solve their customers’ problems. This involves “design thinking” and “looking from the user’s perspective”, she added. Chia Hock Lai, president, Singapore FinTech Association, said: “Customer expectations are driving the digital transformation.” He shared his observation that the customer’s last favourable experience is what they expect on their next visit. He also noted that user reactions to technology changes varied across age groups. His point was supported by Ms Greulich-Smith who said that “in any kind of transformation, it’s about offering choice”. Focusing on how people benefit from tech and infrastructure is key in a Smart Nation. Present at the roundtable was Philip Heah, senior director (next generation infrastructure & SMEs), development group, IMDA. He shared that the term “smart nation” evolved from the idea of a “smart city”, where government was not only helping to pull technology and industry, but also national policy and the community into a cohesive whole, hence not just enabling “hardware” but also “heartware” with the community. Yeo Choon Chong, deputy CEO, urban development, Surbana Jurong Consultants, concurred. A smart city is often defined as one that has smart infrastructure. He considered the smart nation an idea with a higher purpose. Mr Lai of NCS also spoke up for “humanising technology” to encourage broader adoption of digital technologies. SPEED AND SURVIVAL By Poon King Wang IS digital transformation something new or something old? After all, many high-tech sectors have been innovating digitally for decades. Why all the fervour now? It is because these high-tech sectors’ innovations have now proliferated to all sectors of the economy and society. They are now grist for the mill for everyone. Thus, any company or city embarking on a transformation can borrow from the experiences of others. Here are five lessons – drawn from the Roundtable conclusions – that corporate and government leaders can adopt and adapt: ■ From “What Tools” to “So What? Who Cares?” Technology is no longer just a tool, department or support function. Smart companies and cities must now also ask what organisations can do – sector and city-wide – and who cares about what it can do. For example, it is not what artificial intelligence or data is that matters. It is what it does – how we use it to create new value for how people live, love, learn and earn. ■ From Concept to Context. Creating new value that people care about means designing solutions that are context-specific. We must add context to concept. To understand context and develop empathy, reports and surveys no longer suffice. We can dig deeper, for example, through simulations, virtual reality, sensors, data analytics, and design thinking. We can also spend time on the frontline, and must translate for citizens/customers/employees, what transformation means for them. DIGITAL DISRUPTION Issues facing firms of today were discussed at length by the technology leaders of public and private sectors. BY JANICE WU Do’s and Don’ts about Digital Transformation From left: Yeo Choon Chong; Chang Sau Sheong; Bernard Leong; Philip Heah; Neo Chia Yann; Tamsin Greulich-Smith; Poon King Wang; Tan Yoong Heng; Prashant Agarwal; Chia Hock Lai; Lai Weng Yew. Don’t assume there’s an endpoint – Ms Greulich-Smith of Smart Health Leadership Centre People love to talk about transformation but they hate to change. Adopting the “Do’s” takes time – Dr Leong of SingPost Patience – Mr Agarwal of AIA Edge Persevere and lead by example – Dr Leong Respect people’s preferences if they choose not to pursue digital transformation – Mr Chang of SP Group Let go of your own stereotypes because digital transformation can mean different things to different people – Mr Agarwal Do challenge assumptions – Ms Greulich-Smith Be customer-centric. But this does not mean acceding to the customer all the time – Dr Leong Try to understand what the experience is like from the customer’s perspective – Ms Greulich-Smith Don’t think of technology first, do think of getting everyone involved – Mr Heah of IMDA Be open and willing to listen to the younger generation – the digital natives. If I’m prepared to hire millennials, I must be prepared to listen to them, in terms of digital transformation – Ms Neo of NCS Don’t assume expertise lies at a certain tier in the organisation. All your stakeholders bring a different expertise to the project – Ms Greulich-Smith Everyone should feel they have a role to play, rather than feeling that they have to work their way up to a position before they can do so – Ms Greulich-Smith Sometimes we can ask ourselves “why not?” – Mr Tan of ARUP With digital transformation, what we are looking at is a reboot of the business model, instead of making incremental enhancements to a business operation – Mr Lai of NCS “When we think of digital transformation and disruption, who is the poster-child? We think of the Ubers, the Airbnbs and so on . . . And when you look across these poster-children, what’s common? What they have in common is speed. What they have in common is analytics to empower, to give mass personalisation . . .(and they) can do that at practically zero incremental cost . . . So these are some of the attributes that lie behind successful digital transformation.” Lai Weng Yew, vice-president, Business Application Services at NCS and co-host of the roundtable discussion Leaders must not conflate implementing digital technology with taking on digital transformation. Mr Lai said that for digital transformation, the criticality of it does not lie only in operating more efficiently. It is about addressing “an existential risk”. That is, if a company does not “reboot” its business quickly, it may go out of business very quickly. The added challenge today is: a company’s competition may not necessarily come from its own industry. Noting that the ongoing digital transformation takes place under the pressure of speed, Mr Agarwal of AIA Edge shared: “People have to realise that you will make the best decision based on what you knew then. And not all of them will play out. And in today’s world, the price of inaction is way higher than the price of a mistake. You can recover from a mistake. It’s very difficult to recover from inaction.” Ms Neo of NCS said that sometimes the inaction is caused by spending too much time in search of a perfect solution. Instead a quick and acceptable one that is refined over time may yield better results in the fast-paced environment. Dr Leong of SingPost added that digital transformation could be tailored to take a problem-centric approach that focuses on the customer and the business outcomes to be achieved. That said, the same digital technologies Five lessons for leaders of the future ■ From Secure+Stabilise to Explore+ Experiment. Transformation creates a dilemma: how to keep key services and infrastructure secure and stable, but yet explore and exploit new opportunities? We can create two tiers of organisation structure and infrastructure. One tier takes charge of and anchors the business-as-usual; the second experiments – and allows for experiments – with new possibilities (for example, a Digital Business Unit; an API layer for collaborators’ access). ■ From Experts to Expert Novices. We used to strive to be experts; we must now strive to be expert novices too. Transformation never ends as digital advances always accelerate. Experts easily become novices with the next technological wave. Experts constantly have to pick up new understanding, empathy, mindsets, and skills. Experts will have to learn to learn from anyone who knows the context best, regardless of age, hierarchy, and qualification. Source: The Business Times © Singapore Press Holdings Limited. Permission required for reproduction. that disrupt can also be used to speed up transformation. Here, it might be appropriate to bring in an example that was related by Tan Yoong Heng, Singapore office leader, ARUP. He said that in ARUP, the design stage of a project can take place across three or four offices around the world at the same time. This is enabled by digital design and virtual collaboration. In ARUP’s case, this was driven by the need to optimise their resources; in particular the company’s deep-skill professionals. Virtual collaboration enabled an ARUP professional to work on several projects within tight timelines, without incurring hefty travel expenses. COMPLEXITY Digital transformation is hence a complex endeavour. In view of the complexity required, the moderator Mr Poon of SUTD, brought back an earlier insight by Chang Sau Sheong, managing director, digital technology, SP Group, who pointed out that digital innovation had been par for the course for decades for many high-tech sectors. Mr Poon asked if “digital transformation” was an accurate or even sufficient description of the changes that businesses have to make in response to digital disruption. Mr Chang suggested: “Just take out the word ‘digital’ and go with ‘transformation’.” Mr Heah of IMDA talked about an “engaged economy” while Ms Neo of NCS mentioned an “immersive economy”. In general, the responses revealed the multi-faceted complexity that leaders have to grapple with. Just as crucial to solving transformation problems – be it with perfect or optimal solutions – is developing the skills to do so. To this end, Ms Greulich-Smith from Smart Health Leadership Centre suggested that “disruptive transformation” might be a more accurate description for digital transformation. She explained that disruptive transformation usually happens when incremental innovations have been done but more is needed to fix the problem. Dr Leong of SingPost offered an alternative view: “We have to be very stubborn on the vision, but very flexible on the implementation.” To pull off digital transformation, he suggested: “Give the P&L (profit & loss) responsibility to the digital leader. Once the digital leader owns the P&L, his first inclination will be ‘what are the quick wins of using technology to resolve a problem?’.Once he has some quick wins established, he can build on them to achieve medium and long term wins.” Mr Lai of NCS listed some traits associated with companies that have been successful with digital transformation. He said: “When we think of digital transformation and disruption, who is the poster-child? We think of the Ubers, the Airbnbs and so on . . . And when you look across these poster-children, what’s common? What they have in common is speed. What they have in common is analytics to empower, to give mass personalisation . . . (and they) can do that at practically zero incremental cost . . . So these are some of the attributes that lie behind successful digital transformation.” And there you have it, choice pickings from a discussion that looks at how leaders and their organisations can thrive in this age of digital transformation. For the lessons distilled from this conversation, the moderator Mr Poon of SUTD, has succinctly presented them in the adjacent story. Panel in discussion about the fervour surrounding high-tech sectors' innovations. ■ From Role of Technology to Role of Humans. Digital transformation discussions tend to focus on the role of technology. But for anyone involved in and affected by these transformations, the people matters quickly loom large. We should shift the discussions to centre on the role of humans. We must account for human capacities, experiences, aspirations and fears. We have to be clear on the human values that will guide us as we make choices that involve and affect people. Because ultimately, digital transformation is a very human endeavour. ❚ The writer is director of LKY Centre for Innovative Cities and moderator for this event This page is brought to you by: 5
Change of Ownership-Tenancy - Utilities Account Transfer.pdfhttps://www.spgroup.com.sg/dam/jcr:ed7ecbae-862c-4fbd-9bb9-7cd84c97ddac/Change%20of%20Ownership-Tenancy%20-%20Utilities%20Account%20Transfer.pdf
Change of Ownership/ Tenancy Utilities Account Transfer Form SP SERVICES LTD Contact Log Ref: ________________ (Acting for itself and as agent for and on behalf of PUB and City Energy Pte. Ltd. (as Trustee of City Energy Trust) for the supply of utilities, and as agent for Veolia ES Singapore Pte Ltd, Colex Environmental Pte Ltd, SembWaste Pte Ltd, 800 Super Waste Management Pte Ltd, TEE Environmental Pte. Ltd. and Alba W&H Smart City Pte. Ltd. in relation to the collection of refuse.) NEW ACCOUNT HOLDER’S PARTICULARS (Co. Registration No. 199504470N) For Application in Personal name: Name of Transferee (Mr/Mrs/Mdm/Ms/Dr):______________________________ (“the Consumer”) Declaration Please check here if you are an undischarged bankrupt. NRIC/FIN (Copy of NRIC/FIN is required):_______________ For the purpose of application for water, gas and electricity only Date of Birth (DDMMYY): __________________________ Bankruptcy Number: _____________________________ For Application in Company name: Name of Company (Transferee): ____________________________________ Co Reg No.: _____________ Co Reg Date: _____________ (“the Consumer”) Contact Person: ______________________________ Principal Activities (I) No.: __________________________________ (As shown on your ACRA Business Profile) DETAILS OF PREMISES a. Premises Address: __________________________________________________________________________________ ________________________________________________________________ S ________________ b. Type of Occupancy: Owner Tenant c. Type of Account: Domestic Non-Domestic d. Use of Premises (See Annex): (indicate index no.) (Security Deposit required. Please make cheque payable to SP Services Ltd) e. GST Reg No. & GST Reg Date: _________________________ ____ (DD)_______(MM)_________(YYYY) Only applicable to premises with PV (ie. Photovoltaics) installed WARNING: IT IS AN OFFENCE UNDER THE PUBLIC UTILITIES ACT (CAP 261) TO MAKE ANY FALSE STATEMENT, REPRESENTATION OR DECLARATION IN CONNECTION WITH THE APPLICATION FOR WATER SUPPLIED BY THE PUBLIC UTILITIES BOARD. Utilities Account Number of Transferor (outgoing customer) (A new account number will be given to the transferee upon process of the application) Meter Reading Date DDMMYY (This form is to be submitted within 3 days from the reading date) ELECTRICITY* WATER** GAS (if any) - (Record only the white numbers) (Record only the first five numbers from the left – four black and one red.) (Record only the black numbers) The above meter readings are required to facilitate the billing of both transferor and transferee utilities accounts. Invalid readings will be rejected. *I/We acknowledge that I/we am/are required to engage a licensed electrical worker (LEW) to inspect and test my electrical installation if I have made any alteration or rewiring to it. Thereafter, the LEW will lodge a copy of Certificate of Compliance (CoC) together with this application to SPGroup to check my electrical installation if the electrical installation is exempted from an Electrical Installation Licence. **I/We acknowledge that I/we am/are required to engage a licensed plumber (LP) to submit the notification for water service installation (WSI) work if I have made any addition or alteration to existing piping. As the account holder, please ensure that you and your contractor (if any) do not tamper with or remove PUB’s water meter without PUB’s prior approval. Upon completion, please submit this form with the following documents: a. Copy of NRIC/ FIN card of transferee In addition to (a), the following documents are required for Commercial accounts: b. Copy of Business/ Company Registration Certificate c. Proof of ownership/ Tenancy agreement d. Letter of authorisation (required if signatory is not a Director according to ACRA listing) e. Initial security deposit (please visit www.spgroup.com.sg for more details) Note: This form is not applicable for master accounts, accounts starting with “930”, electricity supply above 45kVA for non-domestic accounts and temporary supply of utilities. For payment of deposit via cheque, please make the cheque payable to SP Services Ltd. For Gas Turn-on /Installation, please call City Energy Pte. Ltd. (as Trustee of City Energy Trust) at 1800-555 1661 for an appointment. Installation and Termination of gas supply fees apply. You need not call if the gas supply for the previous occupant is connected. 1. I/We agree that each application for a utility, when accepted, will constitute a binding contract between myself/ourselves and PUB / SP Services Ltd / City Energy Pte. Ltd. (as Trustee of City Energy Trust) / Veolia ES Singapore Pte Ltd / Colex Environmental Pte Ltd / SembWaste Pte Ltd / 800 Super Waste Management Pte Ltd / TEE Environmental Pte. Ltd. and/or Alba W&H Smart City Pte. Ltd. (as the case may be) and I/we agree that such contract shall be separate and independent from each other and shall be separately enforceable. 2. In the event that I/we make an application for gas at a later date, I/we agree to be bound by the terms and conditions for supply of gas set out in Part III overleaf and such other terms and conditions which City Energy Pte. Ltd. (as Trustee of City Energy Trust) may, at its absolute discretion, notify and impose. I/We understand that nothing herein shall be constructed as an offer by City Energy Pte. Ltd. (as Trustee of City Energy Trust) to supply gas to me / us and that City Energy Pte. Ltd. (as Trustee of City Energy Trust) has the absolute discretion to reject my application for gas supply for any reason. 3. I/We acknowledge and agree that SP Services Ltd reserves the right to transfer any amounts due and owing arising from my/ our previous/ closed account to an existing/ new account belonging to me/ us. 4. I/We agree to be bound by the terms and conditions specified by each supplier as set out in Part I (Water Supply) / Part II (Electricity Supply) / Part III (Gas Supply) / Part IV (Collection of Refuse) overleaf. 5. I/We acknowledge and agree that PUB, SP Services Ltd, City Energy Pte. Ltd. (as Trustee of City Energy Trust), Veolia ES Singapore Pte Ltd, Colex Environmental Pte Ltd, SembWaste Pte Ltd, 800 Super Waste Management Pte Ltd, TEE Environmental Pte. Ltd. and/or Alba W&H Smart City Pte. Ltd. (as the case may be) may collect, use and disclose to any third party and all particulars relating to my/our personal information, in accordance with the Personal Data Protection Act 2012 and SP Group’s data protection policy (available at SP Group’s website https://www.spgroup.com.sg/personal-data-protection-policy), for the purposes of (i) providing the requested services; (ii) billing and account management (including debt collection or recovery); (iii) conducting surveys or obtaining feedback; (iv) informing me / us of their or their related entities’ and business affiliates’ services and offers (unless I/we duly inform you otherwise); and (v) complying with all applicable laws and regulations, and business requirements. 6. If I/we am/are (or subsequently become) GST-registered, I/we agree that I/we will not issue any tax invoice for electricity sold to SP Services Ltd but hereby authorize SP Services Ltd to issue tax invoices on my/our behalf. I/We further agree that where SP Services Ltd issues any tax invoice(s) on my behalf in respect of any taxable supplies that I/we provide, SP Services Ltd shall be entitled to charge GST at the prevailing rate as at the date on which such taxable supplies are provided. 7. I/We will notify SP Services Ltd in writing immediately if there is any change to my/our GST status, including without limitation if my/our GST registration is cancelled; I/we am/are not currently GST-registered but subsequently become GST-registered; I/We am/are issued with a new GST registration number, etc. Walk-in: 490 Lor 6 Toa Payoh #09-11 HDB Hub Biz Three Lift Lobby 1 Singapore 310490 Hotline: 1800-2222333 Website: www.spgroup.com.sg Version 3.9 / 01 / 24 SP SERVICES LTD (Acting for itself and as agent for and on behalf of PUB and City Energy Pte. Ltd. (as Trustee of City Energy Trust) for the supply of utilities, and as agent for Veolia ES Singapore Pte Ltd, Colex Environmental Pte Ltd, SembWaste Pte Ltd, 800 Super Waste Management Pte Ltd, TEE Environmental Pte. Ltd. and Alba W&H Smart City Pte. Ltd. in relation to the collection of refuse.) PART I Terms and Conditions of the Contract for the Supply of Water by the PUB 1 The Consumer shall pay an initial deposit and maintain it at an amount not less than one and a half times the monthly charges. For non-Singaporeans and nonpermanent residents an amount not less than 3 times the monthly charges. 2 The Consumer shall accept liability for this account. 3 Either party may give 4 working days' notice in writing to the other party to terminate this agreement. 4 If the water meter does not in the opinion of PUB correctly register the amount of water supplied to the Premises, PUB shall be entitled to charge such sum as it shall assess and the Consumer shall accept such assessment as final and conclusive. 5 The Consumer shall pay for the water supplied to the Premises at the appropriate water tariff according to the use of the Premises. The Consumer shall notify PUB of the change of use of the Premises within 7 days of such change. 6 The Consumer shall pay a fee on every reminder issued to the Consumer for failure to make payment in accordance with a bill sent to the Consumer. 7 The Consumer shall pay a late payment charge of 1% on any outstanding amount owed by the Consumer, or at such rate as may be gazetted by PUB from time to time. 8 PUB shall not be liable for any failure or inconsistency in the water supply to the Premises whatsoever and howsoever caused. 9 The Consumer’s attention is drawn to its duties and obligations in the Public Utilities Act (Cap 261) and the Public Utilities (Water Supply) Regulations, as amended from time to time. PART II Terms and Conditions of the Contract for the Supply of Electricity by SP Services Ltd ("SP Services") 1 The Consumer shall pay an initial deposit and maintain it at an amount not less than one and a half times the monthly charges. For non-Singaporeans and nonpermanent residents an amount not less than 3 times the monthly charges. 2 The Consumer shall accept liability for this account. 3 Either party may give 4 working days' notice in writing to the other party to terminate this agreement. 4 If the electricity meter does not in the opinion of SP Services correctly register the amount of electricity supplied to the Premises, SP Services shall be entitled to charge such sum as it shall assess. 5 The Consumer shall pay for the electricity supplied to the Premises at such rates of electricity tariffs for the appropriate category of consumer as is fixed by SP Services from time to time. 6 The Consumer shall pay a fee, as is fixed by SP Services from time to time, for every reminder issued to the Consumer for failure to make payment in accordance with a bill sent to the Consumer. 7 The Consumer shall pay a late payment charge of 1% on any outstanding amount owed by the Consumer. 8 SP Services shall not be liable for any failure or defect in the supply of electricity to the Premises whatsoever and howsoever caused. PART III Terms and Conditions of the Contract for the Supply of Gas by City Energy Pte. Ltd. (as Trustee of City Energy Trust) ("City Energy") 1 City Energy has appointed SP Services Ltd to be its agent for the opening and termination of this gas supply account, and the billing, collection and settlement of all charges under this account. 2 The Consumer shall pay an initial deposit and maintain it at an amount not less than one and a half times the monthly charges. For non-Singaporeans and nonpermanent residents an amount not less than 3 times the monthly charges. 3 The Consumer shall accept liability for this account. 4 Either party may give 4 working days' notice in writing to the other party to terminate this agreement. 5 If the gas meter does not in the opinion of City Energy correctly register the amount of gas supplied to the Premises, City Energy shall be entitled to charge such sum as it shall assess. 6 The Consumer shall pay for the gas supplied to the Premises at such rates of gas tariffs for the appropriate category of consumer as is fixed by City Energy from time to time. The Consumer shall notify SP Services Ltd of the change of use of the Premises within 7 days of such change. 7 The Consumer shall pay a fee, as is fixed by City Energy from time to time, for every reminder issued to the Consumer for failure to make payment in accordance with a bill sent to the Consumer. 8 The Consumer shall pay a late payment charge of 1% on any outstanding amount owed by the Consumer. 9 City Energy shall not be liable for any failure or defect in the supply of gas to the Premises whatsoever and howsoever caused. PART IV Terms and Conditions of the Contract for the Collection of Refuse by either Veolia ES Singapore Pte Ltd, Colex Environmental Pte Ltd, SembWaste Pte Ltd, 800 Super Waste Management Pte Ltd, TEE Environmental Pte. Ltd. and Alba W&H Smart City Pte. Ltd. (collectively referred to as “Refuse Collection Companies”) 1 The Refuse Collection Companies have appointed SP Services Ltd to be their agent for the opening and termination of this refuse collection account, and the billing, collection and settlement of all charges under this account. 2 The Consumer shall accept liability for this account. 3 Either party may give 4 working days' notice in writing to the other party to terminate this agreement. 4 The Consumer shall pay for the refuse collection service performed at the Premises at such rates for the appropriate category of consumer as is fixed by the National Environment Agency from time to time or at such rates determined between the Consumer and the relevant Refuse Collection Company where the Premises do not fall under the Public Waste Collection Scheme and the refuse collection is contracted privately. The Consumer shall notify SP Services Ltd of the change of use of the Premises within 7 days of such change. 5 The Consumer shall pay a fee, as is fixed by the Refuse Collection Companies from time to time, for every reminder issued to the Consumer for failure to make payment in accordance with a bill sent to the Consumer. 6 The Consumer shall pay a late payment charge of 1% on any outstanding amount owed by the Consumer. 7 The Refuse Collection Companies shall not be liable for any failure or defect in the collection of refuse at the Premises whatsoever and howsoever caused. Name: NRIC/FIN: Tel No: E-mail Address: ______________________________________________ Signature of Transferor (Co Stamp if applicable) (Outgoing Customer) Mailing Address: (if different from premises) Name: _______________________________________________ Signature of Transferee (Co Stamp if applicable) (Incoming Customer) NRIC/FIN (Copy of NRIC/FIN is required): For the purpose of application for water, gas and electricity only Tel No: E-mail Address: If you're an e-bill user, your e-bill will be sent to your existing e-services email address Mailing Address: (if different from premises) For Official Use Utility A/C No: ___________________________ Application Collected by: _________________________ Deposit to be billed: $ _______________ Date of Application received: _________________ Appt Date and Time Scheduled: ____________________ Request for GIRO Form � Yes � No Remark: _____________________________________________ Walk-in: 490 Lor 6 Toa Payoh #09-11 HDB Hub Biz Three Lift Lobby 1 Singapore 310490 Hotline: 1800-2222333 Website: www.spgroup.com.sg Version 3.9 / 01 / 24 SP SERVICES LTD (Acting for itself and as agent for and on behalf of PUB and City Energy Pte. Ltd. (as Trustee of City Energy Trust) for the supply of utilities, and as agent for Veolia ES Singapore Pte Ltd, Colex Environmental Pte Ltd, SembWaste Pte Ltd, 800 Super Waste Management Pte Ltd, TEE Environmental Pte. Ltd. and Alba W&H Smart City Pte. Ltd. in relation to the collection of refuse.) Annex Use of Premises Residential Premises For premises where water supplied are used exclusively for residential purposes including staff housing. 001 Residential 002 Home office scheme 003 Staff housing / quarters 004 Common services of HDB / condominium / private apartment 005 Hostel 006 Boarding House 007 Dormitory 008 Service apartment 009 Child care centre 010 School / education institution 011 Office 012 Retail / services 013 Food and beverage 014 Place of worship 015 Bin centre 016 Carpark 017 Welfare facilities 018 Construction site 019 Residents’ / senior citizens’ corner Commercial Premises For premises which is used for the purposes of or in connection with any trade, business or profession. 901 Residential (for Shophouses only) 902 Home office scheme (for Shophouses only) 903 Staff housing / quarters (for Shophouses only) 905 Hostel 906 Boarding House 907 Dormitory 908 Service apartment 909 Child care centre 910 School / education institution 911 Office 912 Retail / services 913 Food and beverage 914 Place of worship 915 Bin centre 916 Carpark 917 Welfare facilities 918 Construction site 920 Industrial 921 Government / public facilities 922 Medical facilities 923 Warehouse / storage facilities 924 Farm 925 Sports and recreation 926 Common services Walk-in: 490 Lor 6 Toa Payoh #09-11 HDB Hub Biz Three Lift Lobby 1 Singapore 310490 Hotline: 1800-2222333 Website: www.spgroup.com.sg Version 3.9 / 01 / 24
Change of Ownership Tenancy Form.pdfhttps://www.spgroup.com.sg/dam/jcr:ed7ecbae-862c-4fbd-9bb9-7cd84c97ddac/Change%20of%20Ownership%20Tenancy%20Form.pdf
Change of Ownership/ Tenancy Utilities Account Transfer Form SP SERVICES LTD Contact Log Ref: ________________ (Acting for itself and as agent for and on behalf of PUB and City Energy Pte. Ltd. (as Trustee of City Energy Trust) for the supply of utilities, and as agent for Veolia ES Singapore Pte Ltd, Colex Environmental Pte Ltd, SembWaste Pte Ltd, 800 Super Waste Management Pte Ltd, TEE Environmental Pte. Ltd. and Alba W&H Smart City Pte. Ltd. in relation to the collection of refuse.) NEW ACCOUNT HOLDER’S PARTICULARS (Co. Registration No. 199504470N) For Application in Personal name: Name of Transferee (Mr/Mrs/Mdm/Ms/Dr):______________________________ (“the Consumer”) Declaration Please check here if you are an undischarged bankrupt. NRIC/FIN (Copy of NRIC/FIN is required):_______________ For the purpose of application for water, gas and electricity only Date of Birth (DDMMYY): __________________________ Bankruptcy Number: _____________________________ For Application in Company name: Name of Company (Transferee): ____________________________________ Co Reg No.: _____________ Co Reg Date: _____________ (“the Consumer”) Contact Person: ______________________________ Principal Activities (I) No.: __________________________________ (As shown on your ACRA Business Profile) DETAILS OF PREMISES a. Premises Address: __________________________________________________________________________________ ________________________________________________________________ S ________________ b. Type of Occupancy: Owner Tenant c. Type of Account: Domestic Non-Domestic d. Use of Premises (See Annex): (indicate index no.) (Security Deposit required. Please make cheque payable to SP Services Ltd) e. GST Reg No. & GST Reg Date: _________________________ ____ (DD)_______(MM)_________(YYYY) Only applicable to premises with PV (ie. Photovoltaics) installed WARNING: IT IS AN OFFENCE UNDER THE PUBLIC UTILITIES ACT (CAP 261) TO MAKE ANY FALSE STATEMENT, REPRESENTATION OR DECLARATION IN CONNECTION WITH THE APPLICATION FOR WATER SUPPLIED BY THE PUBLIC UTILITIES BOARD. Utilities Account Number of Transferor (outgoing customer) (A new account number will be given to the transferee upon process of the application) Meter Reading Date DDMMYY (This form is to be submitted within 3 days from the reading date) ELECTRICITY* WATER** GAS (if any) - (Record only the white numbers) (Record only the first five numbers from the left – four black and one red.) (Record only the black numbers) The above meter readings are required to facilitate the billing of both transferor and transferee utilities accounts. Invalid readings will be rejected. *I/We acknowledge that I/we am/are required to engage a licensed electrical worker (LEW) to inspect and test my electrical installation if I have made any alteration or rewiring to it. Thereafter, the LEW will lodge a copy of Certificate of Compliance (CoC) together with this application to SPGroup to check my electrical installation if the electrical installation is exempted from an Electrical Installation Licence. **I/We acknowledge that I/we am/are required to engage a licensed plumber (LP) to submit the notification for water service installation (WSI) work if I have made any addition or alteration to existing piping. As the account holder, please ensure that you and your contractor (if any) do not tamper with or remove PUB’s water meter without PUB’s prior approval. Upon completion, please submit this form with the following documents: a. Copy of NRIC/ FIN card of transferee In addition to (a), the following documents are required for Commercial accounts: b. Copy of Business/ Company Registration Certificate c. Proof of ownership/ Tenancy agreement d. Letter of authorisation (required if signatory is not a Director according to ACRA listing) e. Initial security deposit (please visit www.spgroup.com.sg for more details) Note: This form is not applicable for master accounts, accounts starting with “930”, electricity supply above 45kVA for non-domestic accounts and temporary supply of utilities. For payment of deposit via cheque, please make the cheque payable to SP Services Ltd. For Gas Turn-on /Installation, please call City Energy Pte. Ltd. (as Trustee of City Energy Trust) at 1800-555 1661 for an appointment. Installation and Termination of gas supply fees apply. You need not call if the gas supply for the previous occupant is connected. 1. I/We agree that each application for a utility, when accepted, will constitute a binding contract between myself/ourselves and PUB / SP Services Ltd / City Energy Pte. Ltd. (as Trustee of City Energy Trust) / Veolia ES Singapore Pte Ltd / Colex Environmental Pte Ltd / SembWaste Pte Ltd / 800 Super Waste Management Pte Ltd / TEE Environmental Pte. Ltd. and/or Alba W&H Smart City Pte. Ltd. (as the case may be) and I/we agree that such contract shall be separate and independent from each other and shall be separately enforceable. 2. In the event that I/we make an application for gas at a later date, I/we agree to be bound by the terms and conditions for supply of gas set out in Part III overleaf and such other terms and conditions which City Energy Pte. Ltd. (as Trustee of City Energy Trust) may, at its absolute discretion, notify and impose. I/We understand that nothing herein shall be constructed as an offer by City Energy Pte. Ltd. (as Trustee of City Energy Trust) to supply gas to me / us and that City Energy Pte. Ltd. (as Trustee of City Energy Trust) has the absolute discretion to reject my application for gas supply for any reason. 3. I/We acknowledge and agree that SP Services Ltd reserves the right to transfer any amounts due and owing arising from my/ our previous/ closed account to an existing/ new account belonging to me/ us. 4. I/We agree to be bound by the terms and conditions specified by each supplier as set out in Part I (Water Supply) / Part II (Electricity Supply) / Part III (Gas Supply) / Part IV (Collection of Refuse) overleaf. 5. I/We acknowledge and agree that PUB, SP Services Ltd, City Energy Pte. Ltd. (as Trustee of City Energy Trust), Veolia ES Singapore Pte Ltd, Colex Environmental Pte Ltd, SembWaste Pte Ltd, 800 Super Waste Management Pte Ltd, TEE Environmental Pte. Ltd. and/or Alba W&H Smart City Pte. Ltd. (as the case may be) may collect, use and disclose to any third party and all particulars relating to my/our personal information, in accordance with the Personal Data Protection Act 2012 and SP Group’s data protection policy (available at SP Group’s website https://www.spgroup.com.sg/personal-data-protection-policy), for the purposes of (i) providing the requested services; (ii) billing and account management (including debt collection or recovery); (iii) conducting surveys or obtaining feedback; (iv) informing me / us of their or their related entities’ and business affiliates’ services and offers (unless I/we duly inform you otherwise); and (v) complying with all applicable laws and regulations, and business requirements. 6. If I/we am/are (or subsequently become) GST-registered, I/we agree that I/we will not issue any tax invoice for electricity sold to SP Services Ltd but hereby authorize SP Services Ltd to issue tax invoices on my/our behalf. I/We further agree that where SP Services Ltd issues any tax invoice(s) on my behalf in respect of any taxable supplies that I/we provide, SP Services Ltd shall be entitled to charge GST at the prevailing rate as at the date on which such taxable supplies are provided. 7. I/We will notify SP Services Ltd in writing immediately if there is any change to my/our GST status, including without limitation if my/our GST registration is cancelled; I/we am/are not currently GST-registered but subsequently become GST-registered; I/We am/are issued with a new GST registration number, etc. Walk-in: 490 Lor 6 Toa Payoh #09-11 HDB Hub Biz Three Lift Lobby 1 Singapore 310490 Hotline: 1800-2222333 Website: www.spgroup.com.sg Version 3.9 / 01 / 24 SP SERVICES LTD (Acting for itself and as agent for and on behalf of PUB and City Energy Pte. Ltd. (as Trustee of City Energy Trust) for the supply of utilities, and as agent for Veolia ES Singapore Pte Ltd, Colex Environmental Pte Ltd, SembWaste Pte Ltd, 800 Super Waste Management Pte Ltd, TEE Environmental Pte. Ltd. and Alba W&H Smart City Pte. Ltd. in relation to the collection of refuse.) PART I Terms and Conditions of the Contract for the Supply of Water by the PUB 1 The Consumer shall pay an initial deposit and maintain it at an amount not less than one and a half times the monthly charges. For non-Singaporeans and nonpermanent residents an amount not less than 3 times the monthly charges. 2 The Consumer shall accept liability for this account. 3 Either party may give 4 working days' notice in writing to the other party to terminate this agreement. 4 If the water meter does not in the opinion of PUB correctly register the amount of water supplied to the Premises, PUB shall be entitled to charge such sum as it shall assess and the Consumer shall accept such assessment as final and conclusive. 5 The Consumer shall pay for the water supplied to the Premises at the appropriate water tariff according to the use of the Premises. The Consumer shall notify PUB of the change of use of the Premises within 7 days of such change. 6 The Consumer shall pay a fee on every reminder issued to the Consumer for failure to make payment in accordance with a bill sent to the Consumer. 7 The Consumer shall pay a late payment charge of 1% on any outstanding amount owed by the Consumer, or at such rate as may be gazetted by PUB from time to time. 8 PUB shall not be liable for any failure or inconsistency in the water supply to the Premises whatsoever and howsoever caused. 9 The Consumer’s attention is drawn to its duties and obligations in the Public Utilities Act (Cap 261) and the Public Utilities (Water Supply) Regulations, as amended from time to time. PART II Terms and Conditions of the Contract for the Supply of Electricity by SP Services Ltd ("SP Services") 1 The Consumer shall pay an initial deposit and maintain it at an amount not less than one and a half times the monthly charges. For non-Singaporeans and nonpermanent residents an amount not less than 3 times the monthly charges. 2 The Consumer shall accept liability for this account. 3 Either party may give 4 working days' notice in writing to the other party to terminate this agreement. 4 If the electricity meter does not in the opinion of SP Services correctly register the amount of electricity supplied to the Premises, SP Services shall be entitled to charge such sum as it shall assess. 5 The Consumer shall pay for the electricity supplied to the Premises at such rates of electricity tariffs for the appropriate category of consumer as is fixed by SP Services from time to time. 6 The Consumer shall pay a fee, as is fixed by SP Services from time to time, for every reminder issued to the Consumer for failure to make payment in accordance with a bill sent to the Consumer. 7 The Consumer shall pay a late payment charge of 1% on any outstanding amount owed by the Consumer. 8 SP Services shall not be liable for any failure or defect in the supply of electricity to the Premises whatsoever and howsoever caused. PART III Terms and Conditions of the Contract for the Supply of Gas by City Energy Pte. Ltd. (as Trustee of City Energy Trust) ("City Energy") 1 City Energy has appointed SP Services Ltd to be its agent for the opening and termination of this gas supply account, and the billing, collection and settlement of all charges under this account. 2 The Consumer shall pay an initial deposit and maintain it at an amount not less than one and a half times the monthly charges. For non-Singaporeans and nonpermanent residents an amount not less than 3 times the monthly charges. 3 The Consumer shall accept liability for this account. 4 Either party may give 4 working days' notice in writing to the other party to terminate this agreement. 5 If the gas meter does not in the opinion of City Energy correctly register the amount of gas supplied to the Premises, City Energy shall be entitled to charge such sum as it shall assess. 6 The Consumer shall pay for the gas supplied to the Premises at such rates of gas tariffs for the appropriate category of consumer as is fixed by City Energy from time to time. The Consumer shall notify SP Services Ltd of the change of use of the Premises within 7 days of such change. 7 The Consumer shall pay a fee, as is fixed by City Energy from time to time, for every reminder issued to the Consumer for failure to make payment in accordance with a bill sent to the Consumer. 8 The Consumer shall pay a late payment charge of 1% on any outstanding amount owed by the Consumer. 9 City Energy shall not be liable for any failure or defect in the supply of gas to the Premises whatsoever and howsoever caused. PART IV Terms and Conditions of the Contract for the Collection of Refuse by either Veolia ES Singapore Pte Ltd, Colex Environmental Pte Ltd, SembWaste Pte Ltd, 800 Super Waste Management Pte Ltd, TEE Environmental Pte. Ltd. and Alba W&H Smart City Pte. Ltd. (collectively referred to as “Refuse Collection Companies”) 1 The Refuse Collection Companies have appointed SP Services Ltd to be their agent for the opening and termination of this refuse collection account, and the billing, collection and settlement of all charges under this account. 2 The Consumer shall accept liability for this account. 3 Either party may give 4 working days' notice in writing to the other party to terminate this agreement. 4 The Consumer shall pay for the refuse collection service performed at the Premises at such rates for the appropriate category of consumer as is fixed by the National Environment Agency from time to time or at such rates determined between the Consumer and the relevant Refuse Collection Company where the Premises do not fall under the Public Waste Collection Scheme and the refuse collection is contracted privately. The Consumer shall notify SP Services Ltd of the change of use of the Premises within 7 days of such change. 5 The Consumer shall pay a fee, as is fixed by the Refuse Collection Companies from time to time, for every reminder issued to the Consumer for failure to make payment in accordance with a bill sent to the Consumer. 6 The Consumer shall pay a late payment charge of 1% on any outstanding amount owed by the Consumer. 7 The Refuse Collection Companies shall not be liable for any failure or defect in the collection of refuse at the Premises whatsoever and howsoever caused. Name: NRIC/FIN: Tel No: E-mail Address: ______________________________________________ Signature of Transferor (Co Stamp if applicable) (Outgoing Customer) Mailing Address: (if different from premises) Name: _______________________________________________ Signature of Transferee (Co Stamp if applicable) (Incoming Customer) NRIC/FIN (Copy of NRIC/FIN is required): For the purpose of application for water, gas and electricity only Tel No: E-mail Address: If you're an e-bill user, your e-bill will be sent to your existing e-services email address Mailing Address: (if different from premises) For Official Use Utility A/C No: ___________________________ Application Collected by: _________________________ Deposit to be billed: $ _______________ Date of Application received: _________________ Appt Date and Time Scheduled: ____________________ Request for GIRO Form � Yes � No Remark: _____________________________________________ Walk-in: 490 Lor 6 Toa Payoh #09-11 HDB Hub Biz Three Lift Lobby 1 Singapore 310490 Hotline: 1800-2222333 Website: www.spgroup.com.sg Version 3.9 / 01 / 24 SP SERVICES LTD (Acting for itself and as agent for and on behalf of PUB and City Energy Pte. Ltd. (as Trustee of City Energy Trust) for the supply of utilities, and as agent for Veolia ES Singapore Pte Ltd, Colex Environmental Pte Ltd, SembWaste Pte Ltd, 800 Super Waste Management Pte Ltd, TEE Environmental Pte. Ltd. and Alba W&H Smart City Pte. Ltd. in relation to the collection of refuse.) Annex Use of Premises Residential Premises For premises where water supplied are used exclusively for residential purposes including staff housing. 001 Residential 002 Home office scheme 003 Staff housing / quarters 004 Common services of HDB / condominium / private apartment 005 Hostel 006 Boarding House 007 Dormitory 008 Service apartment 009 Child care centre 010 School / education institution 011 Office 012 Retail / services 013 Food and beverage 014 Place of worship 015 Bin centre 016 Carpark 017 Welfare facilities 018 Construction site 019 Residents’ / senior citizens’ corner Commercial Premises For premises which is used for the purposes of or in connection with any trade, business or profession. 901 Residential (for Shophouses only) 902 Home office scheme (for Shophouses only) 903 Staff housing / quarters (for Shophouses only) 905 Hostel 906 Boarding House 907 Dormitory 908 Service apartment 909 Child care centre 910 School / education institution 911 Office 912 Retail / services 913 Food and beverage 914 Place of worship 915 Bin centre 916 Carpark 917 Welfare facilities 918 Construction site 920 Industrial 921 Government / public facilities 922 Medical facilities 923 Warehouse / storage facilities 924 Farm 925 Sports and recreation 926 Common services Walk-in: 490 Lor 6 Toa Payoh #09-11 HDB Hub Biz Three Lift Lobby 1 Singapore 310490 Hotline: 1800-2222333 Website: www.spgroup.com.sg Version 3.9 / 01 / 24